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  #11  
Old 04-10-2009
Folala Folala is offline
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Congratulations and well done. What I really like about this is that while you've changed your catch, you've retained other aspects of the TI techniques e.g. stream lining, balance, head/body alignment. Interesting to watch your recovery, I've seen some swimmers at my pool using similar technique, I think it's much more important what happens beneath the surface of the water than above it.

Looking forward to reading your "How I got there" story.

Cheers.
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  #12  
Old 04-10-2009
RadSwim RadSwim is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by terry View Post
I think your concerns about rag doll emphasis possibly increasing danger of impingement came from conflating the aims of the ZSwitch drills, with the whole-stroke outcome they are designed to produce.
Terry,

This is a very insightful statement.

Fairly early in my TI training (2005 and 2006), it was clear that the zipperswitch, ear hops, and overswitch drills, with their focus on elbow lead and hand entry near the ear, were not going to work for me, because they resulted in too much internal rotation at the shoulder. Therefore, I deliberately abandoned those drills and found an alternate means of developing a good recovery.

The Birmingham feather approach is almost as different from the zipper switch approach as can be imagined. It emphasizes low, flat arm position, palm always facing the surface of the water, thumb always pointing forward, and elbow trailing the hand throughout recovery. It results in much less internal rotation at the shoulder and less elbow flexion during recovery.

Fascinating that my recovery now looks about the same as it would have if I was able to follow the TI path. Despite different pathways followed to achieve the goal, the final result is the same -- in this case, an efficient recovery technique.

Thanks for the technique suggestions -- I see that the right arm still needs some attention.

Clark
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  #13  
Old 04-10-2009
madvet madvet is offline
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For me during recovery, I have found that keeping the thumb facing forward (forward in the water facing away from my feet) helps to take some strain off my shoulder. Anatomically, the biceps attaches from the shoulder to the top part of the forearm, and rotation of the forearm thumbs-up may take strain off the biceps tendon. You might try that and see if that makes dropping your hand more comfortable.

While I have "loose" shoulders overall, I am sort of "tight" around the front of my shoulders, which is the area of the biceps tendon. It might depend on your anatomy whether your forearm rotation is significant.
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  #14  
Old 04-14-2009
Filarias Filarias is offline
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Clark,

although member of Flowswim your surface video is "private" and I cannot see it. Any shortcut?

Stefanos
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  #15  
Old 04-14-2009
RadSwim RadSwim is offline
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Stefanos-

For privacy, I have limited access to friends and team mates.

Go to my floswimming profile and request to be my friend. Should be in the box near the top of the page.

http://www.floswimming.org/members/radswimmer

Clark
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  #16  
Old 04-15-2009
Syzygy Syzygy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RadSwim View Post
Stefanos-

For privacy, I have limited access to friends and team mates.

Go to my floswimming profile and request to be my friend. Should be in the box near the top of the page.

http://www.floswimming.org/members/radswimmer

Clark
Clark, I am new here but am interested in understanding the points in this thread. I sent a request to become a friend so I can see your videos. I hope you accept. Thx. Sam
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  #17  
Old 05-10-2009
edlevin edlevin is offline
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edlevin
Default Evf Drill

Found this EVF drill - looks like it might be of some help. It seems to me to be consisent with TI. Curious what more experienced people think.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x3ctB...eature=related
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  #18  
Old 05-10-2009
CoachBrian CoachBrian is offline
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Interesting. That's a drill I "devised" about 3 weeks ago. I call it "Skatch", and think it's very good for learning the catch position. My advise is to move towards the full catch position shown in the video in small increments, and then hold the position to imprint it.

I found it difficult to get as much EVF as I wanted when I tried to go immediately to the position. By making the move smaller and building up to more EVF, I was able to get much closer to the position shown on the video.
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  #19  
Old 05-10-2009
RadSwim RadSwim is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edlevin View Post
Found this EVF drill - looks like it might be of some help. It seems to me to be consistent with TI. Curious what more experienced people think.
This video clip is the best demonstration of EVF drilling that I have seen. It illustrates that the technique is really very simple. The difficulty is that the motion is completely unnatural -- we don't make this combination of movements in everyday life. The shoulder joint internal rotators needed for EVF may take some time to develop.

This is a great starting place.

RadSwim
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  #20  
Old 05-11-2009
daveblt daveblt is offline
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In the video seems like that starting position for the drill where the hand is almost near the surface is a little too high ? The arm is pointing uphill .


Dave
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