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  #11  
Old 08-08-2015
Zenturtle Zenturtle is offline
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Respect for this guy, that he taking up the challlange to change his stroke at his age and swimming history-.

You can see he has a deeply ingrained left.right arm connection.
If one starts to move, the other one also moves in the same manner.
So now he is concentrating on the front of his stroke, taking some time to build a paddle, but at the same time he stops the movement of the other arm.
There is the famous : arm stuck at the recovery: phase.
He has to break that automatic connection between left and right arm and think more in left and right side of the body doing slightly different things.
So at the same time he builds his paddle at one side, the other side has to come forward fast without interruptions.
Left and right are doing different things.
A classic cure is doing catchuop stroke, but it shouldnt be used too much.
Its also important not to learn to make a freeze frame after the entry of the hand, while focussing on the recovery, and than realise you have to do something at the front again making the swimming very robotic.
Its building the paddle at the front while staying in contact with the water with the hand and the extending arm under some static tension, but at the same time getting thatother arm recovered at a much higher speed but in a relaxed manner.
And then you also have to breathe at the same time and retain your balance as good as posible.
It aint easy.

You can experiment with the armtiming on dryland. Go from pure oppositte windmilling to pure catchup timing and feel how different it feels.
Doing dryland catchup will reveal shoulder stiffness.

Changing his stroke will take tame.
Be carefull to not loose the swim rhythm and become a swimming robot.
It will be a different rhythm but keep at least the movements fluid and continuous.

He has to build the stroke more from a balanced main body with arm movement on top of that.
Playing a bit with lenghtening and shortening the stroke in one lenght to directly feel the difference.

Looks to me this guy was a pretty fast swimmer in his top days.
He has to work a bit on his high elbow and pull. Now he is slipping when he suddenly applies ¨power to his stroke.
At his normal high rev style the load per armcycle is less and the movement is more fluid outomatically because of the higher strokerate.
If you slow the strokerate down you have to keep the arm in contact with the water at the front and use that extra available time to build a good paddle, otherwise your pull will slip too much when you apply power in a jerky way.
Dropped elbows combined with a slow strokerate are a bad combination.

Take a look at the 1500m swimmers.

Last edited by Zenturtle : 08-08-2015 at 10:14 AM.
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  #12  
Old 08-08-2015
Zenturtle Zenturtle is offline
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Looking at the clip again i see he has very little kick drive in his stroke.
He could gain a lot if he could build a strong kick connection in his stroke.
Even with these dead legs his balance doent seem too bad.
He has a good body for swimming fast.
Dont you have some footage of 20 years ago or someting to see how he was swimming then?
If he always has swum with dead legs and can change that, he could be faster now than 10 years ago.
Doesnt need to be a 6BK, but there is hardly a 2bk either.
Let him feel the big toes touch. Keep the legs together. No scissor kicks wanted.
Maybe he swum like Paltrinieri 20 years ago
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jspP06-i8Aw
Not the best exmple to follow if you are over 65 perhaps, but look at the arm timing of the other guys.
Bend the armtiming a bit towards that style.

Last edited by Zenturtle : 08-08-2015 at 10:49 AM.
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  #13  
Old 08-09-2015
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CoachStuartMcDougal CoachStuartMcDougal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drago View Post
After a week's practice here is a fresh video.
http://deske.hu/iras/html-2015/uszas-2015-08-08.mp4
Would be grateful for any critique/comment.
HI Drago,

I'm coming in a little late, so this may have already been mentioned. At first glance, good head position, hips are high, body line straight (no spine twisting or lateral movement). His main issue is recovery. Notice his arm is bent close to 90 degs at exit with a significant pause when hand exits water. This make for a tense and tight recovery, lifting the elbow up before recovering forward. This is a very common problem though.

Your friend will need to release and extend recovery arm at exit (not push or pull more) to allow momentum to carry from below to above surface. First, release palm facing up at exit. This will help take bend out of elbow and get the recovery arm extended (no elbow bend). Second, concentrate on continuous motion, no pausing at exit near hip. Third, swing elbow wide (no lifting) with "rag doll" relaxed forearm until hand slices in front of head..

Just work one at a time in a set, i.e. swim 50m: "palm up, release", 50m: "continuous motion" no pause at hip, 50m: "swing recovery wide", no lifting elbow.

Stuart
MindBodyAndSwim
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  #14  
Old 08-11-2015
drago drago is offline
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Thanks a lot for the helpfull coments Zenturtle and CoachStuartMcDougal, my friend says they were very clear and also very helpful, he feels he will improve his stroke a lot thanks to you. After a few weeks time he might post another video.
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  #15  
Old 08-30-2015
drago drago is offline
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Here is a new video.
http://deske.hu/iras/html-2015/uszas-2015-08-30.mp4
Once again, my friend would be grateful for any comments or further advice.
He feels his stroke improved but is not satisfied with his hip position and kick.
For me his head looks a bit high and I think this might cause his hip sinking. What do you think?
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  #16  
Old 08-30-2015
Zenturtle Zenturtle is offline
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He is still not there with his timing..
His head could also be a bit lower, but not everything at once.
He is used to this head position now. First other things.
The weight of his recovering arm is hanging too long out of the water behind the lungs, pushing the rear down.
Slow and stable on the lead arm , fast and relaxed forward with the recovering arm.
More patient with the leading arm, more impatient with the recovering hand.
Catchup drill.

Already showed this one? This is the arm entry timing to move to.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DoNhT3y0Nv0

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LplmxO89t9U
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e4iO34K1Ufo

Last edited by Zenturtle : 08-30-2015 at 09:24 PM.
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  #17  
Old 11-27-2015
drago drago is offline
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My friend kept working on his stroke in the past three months. Here is a new video:
http://deske.hu/iras/html-2015/uszas-2015-11-25.mp4
Once again he would be gratefull for any comments, oppinions or advice.
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  #18  
Old 11-27-2015
sclim sclim is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drago View Post
After a week's practice here is a fresh video.
http://deske.hu/iras/html-2015/uszas-2015-08-08.mp4
Would be grateful for any critique/comment.
Please note that I'm just a struggling 67 year old novice swimmer, and not a coach. But I notice that, although compared to the first video, his horizontal alignment has improved, his hips still don't break the surface, compared to how much of his head is showing. To me, this means that if you connect these two points the line you get (parallel to the body axis line) is at least mildly angled downwards at the back.

If he can fix that he would get free power, free speed, etc.

P.S. The fact that his lead arm is starting the catch and pull quite a bit before the recovering and entering arm reaches the front quadrant is aggravating the back-heaviness (might even be the most important cause). Just by following Zenturtle's specific timing/front quadrant/catch-up hints would automatically address the body axis angle issue. Being aware of the hip breaking the surface is merely the clue that it's working.

Last edited by sclim : 11-27-2015 at 06:43 PM.
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  #19  
Old 06-13-2017
drago drago is offline
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After all these years, my friend keeps swimming a self taught TI.
Here is a recent video. Would anyone care to comment?
http://deske.hu/iras/html-2017/uszas-2017-06.mp4
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  #20  
Old 06-13-2017
borate borate is offline
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Dandy! Think of how few 'mature' folks get in the water or exercise. He's getting great exercise and his stroke looks fine.
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