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  #21  
Old 12-21-2011
terry terry is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dougalt View Post
Amidst all the energy expended in kicking drills, with boards, and other "drills", one female swimmer caught my eye: she, alone, was cruising along in very "TI" fashion, just eating up the laps efforlessly, while everyone else was beating their bodies to a pulp. It was clear that the "coach" was not noticing her capabilities, and, she appeared to be very bored/frustrated with the coach-imposed kicking drills.
Doug
There have actually been quite a few teen and younger swimmers trained in TI methods -- and some have later found themselves in conflict with coaches who interpreted their economical use of energy as 'not trying hard enough.'
They're not satisfied unless they see you churning and splashing up a storm and you look distressed during the brief rest intervals they allow.
In one instance a young lady who'd been to one of our camps was thrown out of practice for 'not working.' Her misdeed? Swimming 100y repeats in a smooth 13-14SPL, in comparison to those around her taking 17-18 or more strokes. And here's the crazy part: She was swimming repeats in about 1 min and 1 second - faster than she'd swum before our camp and faster than those around her. Even so, he felt she was sandbagging.
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  #22  
Old 12-21-2011
terry terry is offline
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Originally Posted by dougalt View Post
I personally feel that "Health Seekers" actually ARE "Achievement Seekers"
The distinction I'm seeking to draw there - and I could probably articulate it better - is between those who swim purely to improve their health, and are often relatively unconcerned with speed, and those who have come to TI primarily because they plan to enter a competition.

Our educational/enlightenment process will seek to
1) Draw the competitive types toward holistic practices - that at the same time have been shown to have the potential to maximize their performance in the race. I'm a pretty competitive person myself - I love racing and am most stimulated and engaged in practice when training for an event - but the most valuable lesson I've learned in middle age is to plan my practices around the goal of pursuing transcendence, happiness, purpose and mastery. Since doing so I've enjoyed competitive success far beyond anything I ever dreamed possible.
2) Show those who swim only for health that physically-demanding efforts (i.e. exacting swimming tasks that significantly increase HR and muscle-loading) have been demonstrated to be one of the most important and effective anti-aging activities. They keep cells more 'youthful' than moderate activity. That kind of practice usually benefits from a source of motivation and sense of purpose/engagement greater than the knowledge that it's healthful. You can, after all, feel the burn and raise HR on an elliptical machine at the gym. But when you're doing it while trying to swim your fastest mile (or a shorter distance for that matter), it's a lot more enjoyable and rewarding.
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May your laps be as happy as mine.

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  #23  
Old 12-21-2011
Mike from NS Mike from NS is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by terry View Post
The distinction I'm seeking to draw there - and I could probably articulate it better - is between those who swim purely to improve their health, and are often relatively unconcerned with speed, and those who have come to TI primarily because they plan to enter a competition.
I think I may be part of yet another demographic. That being "the enjoyment seeker". My reason for learning to swim is for the fun of swimming, as well as, I suppose,feeling safer when boating. Neither speed nor health concerns (at this point) are my driving forces. I have no desire to enter competitions... my own compulsion to succeed is my driving force in that regard.
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  #24  
Old 12-21-2011
Donal F Donal F is offline
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I seem to fit the profile, except for these:

Swimming Experience:
I've been swimming for over 50 years, and I first raced over 40 years ago.

Goals:
I enjoyed masters racing, but lately I've been swimming longer distances for myself.

Aspirations?
To swim a 400 IM well. To stay limber. To sleep soundly at night.
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  #25  
Old 12-22-2011
johnny.widen johnny.widen is offline
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Default An 80000 people survey

Terry, first of all I must say that I am no expert in creating or handling surveys. Over the years I have made a few. Many times we have been discussing to make various surveys, especially now when it is so easy to create one using Google Docs, but most of the time we haven't done them because we realized that they won't be of any use.

When designing a survey, you have to very carefully ask questions so you get answers that you actually can evaluate. You must know how to interpret each answer or else they are of no value. I think it is important to have a scientific approach in designing and evaluting surveys. My advice is to consult some expert or consider if you really want to do a survey. The result of a wrongly made survey is of no use, cost a lot of resources and can give a completely wrong picture of peoples actually think.

Maybe, efter all, a visionary guy like you Terry should be more stevejobish. ;-)
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  #26  
Old 12-22-2011
johnny.widen johnny.widen is offline
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Default Technology adoption lifecycle applied to TI

When it comes to introducing new technology or new innovations the Technology adoption lifecycle theory applies.
I think this can be applied even for Total Immersion. My quick translation would be
  1. innovators – the TI coaches and some people in this forum
  2. early adopters – most people in this forum
  3. early majority – more conservative people but open to new ideas, could be convinced by seeing many others using TI with success
  4. late majority – fairly conservative and less active, they really need to see many people and idols use TI to be convinced
  5. laggards – very conservative, will probably never look at TI

One thing worth noting is that it is a waste of time to try to persuade laggards that TI is something good. Just let them be.

However there seems to be a chasm to cross between the first two groups and the third, meaning that it actually take a quite lot of effort to convince the third group. They really need to see the need for TI.

As written before in this thread team coaches need to be convinced the advantage of TI before we can get young people to be TIers. Depending on how open minded or stubborn these coaches are, they are spread in the above grouping. Some of them are really no use to approach at all. One way to convince coaches and young people is to show results. To show swim stars that are TI swimmers. The one and only right now is Sun Yang, however, as said before, we cannot really say he is a true TI swimmer, only that he is just TI-ish.

I think that this can be good to have in mind, when trying to spread the TI word.
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  #27  
Old 12-23-2011
andyinnorway andyinnorway is offline
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Johhny puts this very well.

Perhaps an early majority in ironman should be something to aim for.

TI swimming lets you enjoy the swim as a warm up for your main events and still leave the water in about an hour whilst staying in your fat burning zone.

how many ironmen would like to accomplish that.
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  #28  
Old 12-23-2011
andyinnorway andyinnorway is offline
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The majority of coaches only take note when something obvious happens at an international level.

TI is to swimming what Frosby is to high jump but I do not think the world would have changed its jumping style without his 1968 gold medal.
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  #29  
Old 12-23-2011
ewa.swimmer ewa.swimmer is offline
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ewa.swimmer
Default Question

Although you can't totally separate the two I'm curious if more people come to TI because of the philosophy (Kaizen) or the technical aspects (stroke mechanics and SPL). Do they come for one and stay because of the other? Maybe a survey expert could figure out a question that would answer that.
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  #30  
Old 12-23-2011
westyswoods westyswoods is offline
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I came looking for technique knowing nothing of philosophy. Kaizen has become the driving force in my staying with the technical and slow progress. The journey has been a very positive challenge.

Swim Silent and Be Well
Westy
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