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Old 02-22-2009
shuumai shuumai is offline
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Default Bicipital Tendonitis

I noticed that I had discomfort in the front of my shoulder when moving my arm like I was reaching for a door knob. This video has made me wonder if my shoulder ache is actually bicipital tendonitis: Post Rehab Tips - Shoulder Impingement

In the past my right bicep used to get a little fatigued during a longer crawl. Also, things like a tight streamline with my arms or the breaststoke pull-down seem to aggravate my shoulder a little. My shoulder also pops a little sometimes when doing a crawl pull movement. I was thinking that the cause of the discomfort was shoulder impingement, but now I'm not so sure.

I sometimes do the "6-way shoulder exercise" with a stretchy cord. Though I tend the skip the first two which are stroke-like. Am I on the right track?
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Old 02-23-2009
Rhoda Rhoda is offline
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I used to get this in my keyboard arm. (I do CAD drafting, so one arm is always on the mouse and one is always on the keyboard.) A massage therapist suggested going to a health food store and getting some arnica oil or gel to rub on and that seemed to clear it up pretty quickly considering how long I had it.
To prevent it from coming back, what has worked best is to learn to use the big muscles around and under the shoulder blades to extend my arm in the water, instead of the much smaller shoulder muscles. You can find the shoulder blade muscles by standing with your back to a wall. Raise your arms until they are at 90 degrees to your torso. Then bend them 90 degrees at the elbow so that your hands are sticking straight out from the wall. Slowly rotate them upwards, trying to touch the backs of your hands to the wall, using the muscles under the shoulder blades. You should be feeling as if the 'blades are sliding downward towards your waist.
If you focus on using these same muscles for your leading arm in the water, it should take a lot of pressure off the fronts of your shoulders.
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Old 02-23-2009
shuumai shuumai is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhoda View Post
I used to get this in my keyboard arm. (I do CAD drafting, so one arm is always on the mouse and one is always on the keyboard.) A massage therapist suggested going to a health food store and getting some arnica oil or gel to rub on and that seemed to clear it up pretty quickly considering how long I had it.
To prevent it from coming back, what has worked best is to learn to use the big muscles around and under the shoulder blades to extend my arm in the water, instead of the much smaller shoulder muscles. You can find the shoulder blade muscles by standing with your back to a wall. Raise your arms until they are at 90 degrees to your torso. Then bend them 90 degrees at the elbow so that your hands are sticking straight out from the wall. Slowly rotate them upwards, trying to touch the backs of your hands to the wall, using the muscles under the shoulder blades. You should be feeling as if the 'blades are sliding downward towards your waist.
If you focus on using these same muscles for your leading arm in the water, it should take a lot of pressure off the fronts of your shoulders.
OK, I will try the wall drill. I know you mentioned this before, but I didn't quite get it. Perhaps is will help me to extend closer to 3 o'clock as well.
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Old 02-23-2009
Grant Grant is offline
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Hi Rhoda:
I am having trouble getting this. Have been accused of being spatially challenged.

[quote=Rhoda;1897]. You can find the shoulder blade muscles by standing with your back to a wall. Raise your arms until they are at 90 degrees to your
torso.
1.Are the unbent arms raised 90 degrees from the body sideways (along the wall) and not out in front of the body?

Then bend them 90 degrees at the elbow so that your hands are sticking straight out from the wall.
2.So now are the forearms parallel to the floor and pointing ahead of the body?

Slowly rotate them upwards, trying to touch the backs of your hands to the wall,
If the answer is yes to both of the above (1 & 2) it is impossible to touch the backs of the hands to the wall by rotating them upwards.

Help :o)
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Old 02-24-2009
Rhoda Rhoda is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grant View Post
...1.Are the unbent arms raised 90 degrees from the body sideways (along the wall) and not out in front of the body?
Yes, sorry, should have explained that better. You slide them up the wall.

Quote:
...2.So now are the forearms parallel to the floor and pointing ahead of the body?...
Yes.

Quote:
...If the answer is yes to both of the above (1 & 2) it is impossible to touch the backs of the hands to the wall by rotating them upwards.
Well, you're trying to touch the wall by rotating your shoulder upwards towards the back, how close you actually get depends on your flexibility. You start off in the position you might be in if you were about to do chest presses at the gym while seated upright on a machine and end up in the position you'd be in if you were starting to do a shoulder press with a couple of weights.
Just think in terms of sliding your shoulder blades down towards your waist, there will be some rotation further up in the shoulder joint.
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Old 02-24-2009
shuumai shuumai is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grant View Post
1.Are the unbent arms raised 90 degrees from the body sideways (along the wall) and not out in front of the body?
It's interesting that you mention that distinction. Sometimes when I raise my elbow to slightly higher than shoulder height and out toward the front, bend at the elbow, and lower my hand in front of my face, I feel some discomfort in my shoulder.
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Old 02-24-2009
Grant Grant is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhoda View Post

Well, you're trying to touch the wall by rotating your shoulder upwards towards the back, how close you actually get depends on your flexibility. You start off in the position you might be in if you were about to do chest presses at the gym while seated upright on a machine and end up in the position you'd be in if you were starting to do a shoulder press with a couple of weights.
Just think in terms of sliding your shoulder blades down towards your waist, there will be some rotation further up in the shoulder joint.
Thanks, got it.
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  #8  
Old 02-25-2009
madvet madvet is offline
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Default Avoiding shoulder strain

1st step: See my posts about keeping the thumbs up. It is a somewhat inelegant way of avoiding impingement (on the rotator cuff and/or the biceps tendon) by inappropriate internal rotation.

2nd step: Also, keep your shoulder as relaxed as possible. Very few people swim with a completely relaxed shoulder. Avoid any feeling of tension -- if you are feeling your muscles work, chances are you are fighting an opposing muscle, unless proven otherwise.
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Old 02-25-2009
shuumai shuumai is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by madvet View Post
1st step: See my posts about keeping the thumbs up. It is a somewhat inelegant way of avoiding impingement (on the rotator cuff and/or the biceps tendon) by inappropriate internal rotation.

2nd step: Also, keep your shoulder as relaxed as possible. Very few people swim with a completely relaxed shoulder. Avoid any feeling of tension -- if you are feeling your muscles work, chances are you are fighting an opposing muscle, unless proven otherwise.
The second part...I feel it...tension. Working on it. Especially relaxing during recovery.
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Old 02-26-2009
freshegg freshegg is offline
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This brings up a question I have been wondering about for a while -- When I "spear" my lead arm forward, and I try to get my shoulder to my chin (or my chin to my shoulder) as I extend, am I supposed to actually "shrug" my shoulder up? Because when I do that, I sort of feel like Quasimodo, and it also creates a lot of tension in my shoulder. I feel much more normal, with less stress on my shoulder, if I actually push my shoulder down while extending with my forearm (I think this might be what Rhoda was getting at, but I'm not sure), which is more like how a ballet dancer extends an arm. It feels more like a good stretch to me that way, but then my shoulder doesn't actually reach my chin, either. So which is correct?
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