Total Immersion Forums  

Go Back   Total Immersion Forums > Freestyle
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 08-06-2009
inca inca is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: NY
Posts: 88
inca
Default How does it all fit together

It seems to me that I should be turning my body to the left, pushing my left returning arm forward, starting the pull-back of my right all at the same time. Is this correct?

And where does the 2-beat kick come into this? I am confused as to which foot kicks when.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 08-06-2009
atreides atreides is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 293
atreides
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by inca View Post
It seems to me that I should be turning my body to the left, pushing my left returning arm forward, starting the pull-back of my right all at the same time. Is this correct?

And where does the 2-beat kick come into this? I am confused as to which foot kicks when.
I don't execute this as well as I should but this is how I think it should go.

1. After left hand recovers (you should be streamlined on right side), weight shift (hip drive) left, right leg kick, and right arm pull to finish off move to left side stream line.

2. Glide on left side while right arm recovers. Upon right arm recovery, immediately weight shift right and repeat sequence on the right side (left leg kick and left arm pull). As someone who explained it to me descibed it, "it should feel like ice skating (not that I ice skate but I can imagine the shifts on the right leg and then the left leg that you see ice skaters do)".

The 2BK is a single leg flick on the same side that you are pulling. In other words, right arm pull , right leg kick (left leg goes along or the ride) and left arm pull and left leg kick (right leg goes along for the ride). Watch Shinji Takeguchi videos and you will see his 2BK is a mere flick of the leg on the same side that he pulling. Hope this helps.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 08-06-2009
inca inca is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: NY
Posts: 88
inca
Default

Yes, Atreides, that's very clear. Thanks.

Just one question: I get the idea of the pulling arm and leg kick on the same side at the same time as the hip/weight shift to the left...and is this also the same time that the left arm spears forward to be is that elongated glide as the right hand is pulling back and coming around again?

So then it would be like this, basically:
  • Right arm pulls back. Right leg kicks. Shift hips/body to left and left hand spears forward to get into fully elongated glide.
  • Right arm recovers and just as it enters the water.....
  • Left arm pulls back. Left leg kicks. Body shift to the right and right hand spears forward to get into fully elongated glide.

Oh and then I do have one more stupid, basic question. What exactly is meant by streamlining my legs, and streamlining them while kicking?
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 08-06-2009
atreides atreides is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 293
atreides
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by inca View Post
Yes, Atreides, that's very clear. Thanks.


So then it would be like this, basically:
  • Right arm pulls back. Right leg kicks. Shift hips/body to left and left hand spears forward to get into fully elongated glide.
  • Right arm recovers and just as it enters the water.....
  • Left arm pulls back. Left leg kicks. Body shift to the right and right hand spears forward to get into fully elongated glide.

Oh and then I do have one more stupid, basic question. What exactly is meant by streamlining my legs, and streamlining them while kicking?
My understanding is that you want to engage your hips just after you spear with the recovery hand. The opposite leg (opposite to the spearing hand) adds momentum and finally the pull from the opposite arm. So it should be spear , pivot (hip drive), kick and pull in rapid succession. By engaging your core (assisted by the flick), you really take the pressure off of your arms to supply power. My problem is that I am so arm centric, that I don't properly engage the core. The way I see it is that it should be a series of successive lunges on top of the spearing hand. I ALWAYS initiate forward momentum with a kick/pull without the "twist" that supplies the core power boost. Its all timing and I'm working on it.

I must confess that I really don't know that much about streamling other than it means the position you put your body in to minimize drag. I would guess streamlining your legs would be keeping them close together and as high in the water as you can get them. From my perspective that would minimize the potential drag that they might cause. Streamlining them while kicking means (I think) to kick with your feet close together.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 08-06-2009
inca inca is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: NY
Posts: 88
inca
Default

OK, thanks again for sharing your knowledge with me. I hope to get to the pool this evening and it's good for me to have an idea of what it is I am "aiming" for.

Besides the superman glide/flutter, I really haven't been doing drills...since I don't seem to know what I am doing anyway...so I just try to swim focus on the TI principles as I can.

If anyone has experience teaching someone who is really challenged how to scull in order to be able to keep my head above the water, I'd appreciate any advice. It would give me a great freedom to know that I can stay safe in the water. Shuu gave me the 'instructions' and I understand it but somehow it's not working for me. I can't seem to get the hang of it....I keep going under.

Sometimes I wonder if I'm just made of lead..... =D
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 08-06-2009
madvet madvet is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 230
madvet
Default

No need to scull. You only need to breath for a couple of seconds. So do your superman glide, roll over onto your back and breath, then when you feel ready roll over back to your stomach. Do it in water shallow enough you can stand up in comfortably.

This is similar to what has been taught for drownproofing in the Navy and people have survived for days using this type of technique. You can only keep up treading water for a few minutes.
__________________
John Carey
Madison, Wisconsin
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 08-07-2009
ayesr ayesr is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 92
ayesr
Default Superman w/ "soft" flutter...

I use this drill for warm-up & cooling down. Also the drill is good for studying your hand strokes - keyhole stroke for butterfly & the round elbow stroke for butterfly/freestyle - its mechanics, muscle interaction, position, etc., while underwater.

This drill is vital in studying the concept of balance - the interaction between the head, the feet, the arms, the propulsion...

Also, it will initiate you into certain breathing format.

The feet/head relationship. As your feet sinks, with the soft flutter (no splashes, please), you sink your head and up goes the feet. Sometimes you help the head to sink by hand pushing it down, gently please, at the back. But intentionally hanging it lower, gently is enough. This trick - hanging the head - is what you will do eventually to correct yourself as you do the freestyle (yup, there will be moments as you do your freestyle, slow mo, that the feet will be lower than your body. You either increase the intensity of your kick, flutter - whichever - to correct this. Or just simply - as taught by TI - sink your head, and automatically the feet rises up.

The hands. I move the left in a gentle, no splashes counter clock-wise 6 inch diameter rotation movement (also play around with its position/diameter - just under the water in front, slightly to the side, increase diameter of rotation to wider/smaller diameter. All the while you are gently fluttering.

To breath. Increase the hand rotation diameter (as diameter increases, upward pressure also increases), change the position of your rotating hands, and bring your head up, gently, just enough to clear the mouth to breath. Do this several times if you need more air. You will be nodding in the water. This face front breathing will initiate you to the breathing done in butterly, low-amplitude breast (what TI calls the "sneaky breath").

To assist in lifting your head to breath, another option is to gently with your hands press, put pressure downwards (remember your hands are in front of your head, in the front quadrant), now move them slightly towards you, nearer to your head, together. Experiment with how much pressure to use to lift your head.

Remember, our bodies, in the water will sink - usually the feet goes under first. This is natural. Use this drill to get into balance, and the flutter to provide the fwd propulsion, (and the rotating hands, too).

End.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 08-14-2009
Nicodemus Nicodemus is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 50
Nicodemus
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by inca View Post
Besides the superman glide/flutter, I really haven't been doing drills...since I don't seem to know what I am doing anyway...so I just try to swim focus on the TI principles as I can.

If anyone has experience teaching someone who is really challenged how to scull in order to be able to keep my head above the water, I'd appreciate any advice.
Hi Inca,
What you seem to be saying is -
1. You are not very at ease in water, to the extent that you can't tread water.
2. You don't really understand most of the TI drills.
3. So you have decided to skip the drills & go straight to whole-stroke swimming.

Here in England we have a saying: Don't try to run before you can walk.
Also there is the story about the Tortoise and the Hare.

The TI drills are designed to build your skills progressively. If you don't already have the DVD then buy it. Then work through the drills step by step. Or preferably go on a TI workshop. Trying to just 'jump in at the deep end' is not going to work. Especially if you feel you don't know what you are doing. The TI methodolgy depends on you fully understanding what you are doing. Also the drills are designed to isolate different aspects of your swimming so you can focus & work on them individually. If the just-get-on-with-it approach was a successful one, then the TI drills would never have been invented.

You will only make progress, if you are willing to take a step back first.
Good luck!

Last edited by Nicodemus : 08-14-2009 at 11:00 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 08-14-2009
inca inca is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: NY
Posts: 88
inca
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicodemus View Post
Here in England we have a saying: Don't try to run before you can walk.
Also there is the story about the Tortoise and the Hare.

The TI drills are designed to build your skills progressively. If you don't already have the DVD then buy it. Then work through the drills step by step. Or preferably go on a TI workshop. Trying to just 'jump in at the deep end' is not going to work. Especially if you feel you don't know what you are doing. The TI methodolgy depends on you fully understanding what you are doing. Also the drills are designed to isolate different aspects of your swimming so you can focus & work on them individually. If the just-get-on-with-it approach was a successful one, then the TI drills would never have been invented.

You will only make progress, if you are willing to take a step back first.
Good luck!
Just to explain:

I, too, am a firm believer in taking things slowly from step one. I am the person who reads all the instructions for a game and follows them carefully before starting to play. I am the one who won't start fiddling with her new gadget before reading the instructions and following them.

I've tried to do that with TI, but I cannot do this on my own because I think I am not properly sensing whether what I am doing is actually what I see on the video, and if it isn't I don't know what exactly is wrong. I can tell someone else what I see when they are swimming, but that does not help me. There is no TI instructor here and I also cannot find a TI buddy.

I feel that I have to do whatever it is that I can, though, because I need to exercise.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:08 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.