Total Immersion Forums  

Go Back   Total Immersion Forums > Freestyle
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 12-16-2012
Stevew46 Stevew46 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 36
Stevew46
Default Swimming with my eyes closed - and guess what happened!

Had the local 20M pool to myself today for 30 mins and having very recently realised my TI crawl is everything but! thought I'd try a little experiment and try a few lengths with my eyes closed! I'd worked out it takes me about 16 stokes to get from one end to the other ( I can superman glide in 2 :-) ), so set off from dead centre of the pool and guess what happened? Ill reveal what actually happened after your input, as I'd really be interested (as it might help me go some way to solving why I'm not very good at this) to know what should happen if I was swimming well!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 12-16-2012
CoachSuzanne CoachSuzanne is offline
Coach
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 2,453
CoachSuzanne
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stevew46 View Post
Had the local 20M pool to myself today for 30 mins and having very recently realised my TI crawl is everything but! thought I'd try a little experiment and try a few lengths with my eyes closed! I'd worked out it takes me about 16 stokes to get from one end to the other ( I can superman glide in 2 :-) ), so set off from dead centre of the pool and guess what happened? Ill reveal what actually happened after your input, as I'd really be interested (as it might help me go some way to solving why I'm not very good at this) to know what should happen if I was swimming well!
my guess is that you hit the side wall before finishing your 8 strokes?
__________________
Suzanne Atkinson, MD
Level 3 USAT Coach
USA Paralympic Triathlon Coach
Coach of 5 time USA Triathlon Triathlete of the Year, Kirsten Sass
Steel City Endurance, LTD
Fresh Freestyle

Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 12-16-2012
aquarius aquarius is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 87
aquarius
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stevew46 View Post
Had the local 20M pool to myself today for 30 mins and having very recently realised my TI crawl is everything but! thought I'd try a little experiment and try a few lengths with my eyes closed! I'd worked out it takes me about 16 stokes to get from one end to the other ( I can superman glide in 2 :-) ), so set off from dead centre of the pool and guess what happened? Ill reveal what actually happened after your input, as I'd really be interested (as it might help me go some way to solving why I'm not very good at this) to know what should happen if I was swimming well!
I think it's a good drill to "feel" your stroke and I often do it, but it's very hard to swim straight...
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 12-16-2012
andyinnorway andyinnorway is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 1,680
andyinnorway
Default

It would be funny if you did 25+ strokes looked up and found yourself near the middle of the pool. Funny buy not unusual.

I've had similar horrible experiences in open water but usually only when I try to pick up the tempo and keep my head down. that is I swim less straight when trying to swim faster.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 12-16-2012
Stevew46 Stevew46 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 36
Stevew46
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachSuzanne View Post
my guess is that you hit the side wall before finishing your 8 strokes?
Some how I expected you'd get this right, coach Suzanne, hit the side wall on the left, (approx 12m down was worst) about 12 times out of 20, the right side 6 times out of 20, somewhere between 14-18M down, and twice hit the end wall approx 2m off centre to the right! Could your previous evaluation of my "assymetry" have anything to do with this? Also, and more importantly, I'll ask u first, if I need to give up, and start again, where should I start? I bought the TI freestyle book about a year ago and have been trying to teach myself but I have to admit I've failed, miserably!!! But not in any way deterred!
Steve ( uk)
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 12-16-2012
Jbparis11 Jbparis11 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 29
Jbparis11
Default

I swim with my eyes closed all the time. In a lake, I can never see anything anyways, so I took to keeping my head down and eyes closed (especially once I'm about 1/4 mile out and settling in)...opening occasionally for spotting shore or other swimmers and spotting forward. After much practice in a pool, and hitting more lanelines than I like to admit, I've become quite good at it...but as mentioned above, much better if I swim slow. The practice paid off in my last race. I swam in much straighter line.

The pool is a very easy place to practice (try alternating between eyes closed amd squinting) and it helped me to keep my head down longer without needing to constantly spot ahead when swimming OW.

However, try not to practice it when sharing a lane...that didn't go so well.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 12-17-2012
CoachSuzanne CoachSuzanne is offline
Coach
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 2,453
CoachSuzanne
Default

Stop pulling on the water. That's what's making you go different directions. Learn to feel the thickness of the water on your palm as you extend your arm in skate position, palm facing back fingers tipped down a bit and arm 'draped'. Try doing either (or both) spear switch or swing switch. Go ahead and stroke the lead arm, but DO NOT "pull" on the water. When your brain thinks "pull" the movement your arm does is anti-good-swimming.

Instead, just think about anchoring your palm right where it is in the water, and allow your body to slide past as the opposite are becomes the spearing arm.

This is where people may mis-interpret TI and think taht we don't care about what happens under the water...but the fact is we do care, a LOT. and when people are going off course, frequently the cause is because people are trying too hard to PULL.
__________________
Suzanne Atkinson, MD
Level 3 USAT Coach
USA Paralympic Triathlon Coach
Coach of 5 time USA Triathlon Triathlete of the Year, Kirsten Sass
Steel City Endurance, LTD
Fresh Freestyle

Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 12-17-2012
sinker sinker is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: michigan
Posts: 78
sinker
Default

[quote=CoachSuzanne ---- Learn to feel the thickness of the water on your palm as you extend your arm in skate position, palm facing back fingers tipped down a bit and arm 'draped'. [/QUOTE]

Clarification please. Have read these instructions more than once before and do not understand. When I extend my arm and glide in the skate position with palm facing back and fingers down, the water current is on the back of my hand, not my palm. How can I feel water thickness on my palm under these conditions?
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 12-17-2012
carltontong carltontong is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 10
carltontong
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sinker View Post
Clarification please. Have read these instructions more than once before and do not understand. When I extend my arm and glide in the skate position with palm facing back and fingers down, the water current is on the back of my hand, not my palm. How can I feel water thickness on my palm under these conditions?
Be patient pls:)
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 12-17-2012
CoachSuzanne CoachSuzanne is offline
Coach
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 2,453
CoachSuzanne
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sinker View Post
Clarification please. Have read these instructions more than once before and do not understand. When I extend my arm and glide in the skate position with palm facing back and fingers down, the water current is on the back of my hand, not my palm. How can I feel water thickness on my palm under these conditions?
Feeling it on the back of your hand actually gives you feedback that you're setting up well for the stroke. From that position, as you start yoru stroke you're now changing from your hand creating drag to your palm creating traction.

Elite swimmers can spear flat and create a very slippery positoin and then drop into a catch with their super flexible shoulders and range of motion of the shoulderblade.

But when non-elite swimmers (most of us) spear flat then start a stroke, there tends to be either dropping of the elbow or pushign water aside as we maneuver the joints into a workable position. The problem is that until you're very attuned to what the leader arm does int he water and how the water reacts, you're just not likely to be able to feel whether the water is being pushed to the side or pushed back...they both feel like "pushing".

So trying to still the lead arm a bit, and simply tuning into what you feel on the palm (both the back and the front) and slowly moving through the switch can help you straighten out and "re-organize" your movements.

Any clearer?

It's a case of "slow down to get faster", or in this case, "Slow down to go straight"
__________________
Suzanne Atkinson, MD
Level 3 USAT Coach
USA Paralympic Triathlon Coach
Coach of 5 time USA Triathlon Triathlete of the Year, Kirsten Sass
Steel City Endurance, LTD
Fresh Freestyle

Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 01:44 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.