Total Immersion Forums  

Go Back   Total Immersion Forums > How To Swim A Mile
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 07-20-2013
sojomojo sojomojo is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 109
sojomojo has disabled reputation
Lightbulb How to keep count of swim laps . . .

As a senior citizen learning to swim, my ultimate goal is to swim a mile (1,650 yards) using this website as guidance:

http://ruthkazez.com/ZeroTo1mile.html

I swim in a 25-yard pool so thatís 33 laps. When I swim laps, I tend to zone out, so I lose count after only 5 - 6 laps. It then becomes a guessing game.

There are watches and other mechanical and electronic devices that can count laps, but most have small number displays which I canít read without my reading glasses. I also didnít want to spend that much money for something thatís of limited use out of the pool. It finally dawned on me that thereís an old tool that can be used for counting laps thatís low-tech, low-cost, easy to use, waterproof, damage-proof and idiot-proof.

If youíve been in the military or Boy Scouts, you might be familiar with the Ranger Pace Counting Beads (or the Army abacus). With the advent of GPS and the pedometer, itís not something thatís common in todayís high tech world, but Iíve found it very effective to keep track of how many laps that I have swum. It also gives me a quick visual feedback as to what Iíve swum and how many more laps I need to swim. Itís also a very good motivational tool. Oftentimes I want to give up until I see that I only need a few more beads so I suck it up and push on.

This is how I use the Ranger Pace Counting Beads to count swim laps.

The beads are divided into two sections of 4 (top) and 9 (bottom) beads.

1. Each of the bottom beads equals 1 lap (50 yards).

2. Each of the top beads equals 10 laps (500 yards).

3. After I swim a lap (or two or three laps), I pause to slide one bead for each lap from the bottom section down.

4. When all 9 beads from the bottom section have been slid down, I swim one addition lap and then slide one of the top 4 beads down to show that I completed 10 laps (500 yards). I then slide the 9 bottom beads back to their original position and start all over again.

To get to a swimmerís mile (1,650 yards), I need to finish with 3 of the 4 top beads down (1,500 yards) and 3 of the bottom 9 beads down (150 yards).

I put a small carabiner on my Ranger Pace Counting Beads and attach it to my flip-flop sandals which I keep at the edge of the pool. This keeps it anchored down making it easier to slide the beads and keeps it from getting lost. Iíve also attached it to the lane pool divider.

Hereís a couple of links on how to make and use the Ranger Pace Counting Beads for its intended use. I think you can see how it can apply to counting swim laps.

http://lifehacker.com/5850246/make-a...lking-distance

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4MEynCUua-0

The Ranger Pace Counting Beads are easy to make (be sure to get plastic beads; not metal or wood), but I purchased mine on eBay for $3.99 (with free shipping). Since I only needed one, I figured Iíd end up spending more than $3.99 if I went out and bought the paracord and the beads plus the cost of gasoline driving to the stores.

Hopefully, this tip will help those who need to count laps. It has helped me in my goal to build up my endurance to swim one mile. Itís also helped me to keep an accurate record of the total distance that I swim. I write down distance in my swim log since I want to see how much I can swim in one year.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 04-19-2014
Petunia Petunia is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 1
Petunia
Default Counting laps

I purchased the beads used by beginner golfers to count strokes per hole. The plastic beads slide along a string and have a clip on the end which I attach to my water bottle. Each bead counts as 5 laps. When I stop to rehydrate after 5 or 10 laps, I slide 1-2 beads. 7 beads = a mile.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-15-2014
Talvi Talvi is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Lappeenranta, Finland
Posts: 1,675
Talvi
Default

There is also this little device if you only want to count lengths, but maybe the display is too small: http://www.sportcount.com/featureChart.php
__________________
A psychological disorder is: "Any personal construction which is used repeatedly in spite of consistent invalidation."
~ George Kelly

"The water is your friend.....you don't have to fight with water, just share the same spirit as the water, and it will help you move."
~ Aleksandr Popov
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 06-15-2014
wildman wildman is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 1
wildman
Default

At last a thread I can contribute to -- been lurking for about a year

I use a golf tee on the edge of the pool like the hour hand on a clock. Nudge it one number per lap 1 through 10 then go back to 1 and repeat. Cut a flat side on it so it doesn't roll around. So far, I have no trouble remembering my laps to the nearest ten.

I guess you can forget this method if you flip your turns!!!
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-15-2014
CoachBobM CoachBobM is offline
Coach
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 647
CoachBobM
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Talvi View Post
There is also this little device if you only want to count lengths, but maybe the display is too small: http://www.sportcount.com/featureChart.php
I have been using the SportCount Chrono 100 for many years. Its big advantage over the other methods discussed in this thread is that it doesn't require that you keep stopping to set it. It also gives you a total time for a set, an average lap time, a fastest lap time (and which lap it was), a slowest lap time (and which lap it was), and individual times for up to 100 laps (hence the name). You wear the watch on your index finger, and tap the button when you start and at the end of each length. After you stop, you press the button and hold it down, and it backs up to the end of the last lap and then lets you look at all the times.

I originally began using this watch when I was working on 800m freestyle. I was having to swim 35 lengths of a 25y pool (875y is approximately 800m), and while I could time myself using the second and minute hands of the pace clocks, it was hard to be sure at times whether I had counted the lengths correctly. I'd see an improvement in my time and wonder whether I had really improved or whether I had just miscounted pool lengths. I couldn't look at the watch while I was swimming, but at least when I finished, I could determine whether I'd counted correctly. It was also a lot easier than calculating my time from the pace clock, and it gave me lots of valuable pacing information.

The watch is available through the Store section of this site.


Bob

Last edited by CoachBobM : 06-15-2014 at 05:54 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-27-2014
andrewuza andrewuza is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 9
andrewuza
Default

I swim the alphabet ... 1st wall touch A, second touch B, etc. I do still have to repeat it as I'm swimming ("n, n, n...") but even if I space out a little, I'm usually not more than a letter or so off so it's easier for me to keep track than it has been for me to keep track of numbers while swimming.
__________________
PCOS Support
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-27-2014
Talvi Talvi is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Lappeenranta, Finland
Posts: 1,675
Talvi
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by andrewuza View Post
I swim the alphabet ... 1st wall touch A, second touch B, etc. I do still have to repeat it as I'm swimming ("n, n, n...") but even if I space out a little, I'm usually not more than a letter or so off so it's easier for me to keep track than it has been for me to keep track of numbers while swimming.
BRILLIANT!!!!! For so many reasons.

p.s

@Wildman: congrats on losing your forum virginity I'm not a golfer, but your method seems, to me anyway, to be a really original and neat technique. I think I'd be way too clumsy though!
__________________
A psychological disorder is: "Any personal construction which is used repeatedly in spite of consistent invalidation."
~ George Kelly

"The water is your friend.....you don't have to fight with water, just share the same spirit as the water, and it will help you move."
~ Aleksandr Popov

Last edited by Talvi : 06-27-2014 at 04:37 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 02-07-2015
jenson1a jenson1a is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Southwest Florida
Posts: 671
jenson1a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachBobM View Post
I have been using the SportCount Chrono 100 for many years. Its big advantage over the other methods discussed in this thread is that it doesn't require that you keep stopping to set it. It also gives you a total time for a set, an average lap time, a fastest lap time (and which lap it was), a slowest lap time (and which lap it was), and individual times for up to 100 laps (hence the name). You wear the watch on your index finger, and tap the button when you start and at the end of each length. After you stop, you press the button and hold it down, and it backs up to the end of the last lap and then lets you look at all the times.

I originally began using this watch when I was working on 800m freestyle. I was having to swim 35 lengths of a 25y pool (875y is approximately 800m), and while I could time myself using the second and minute hands of the pace clocks, it was hard to be sure at times whether I had counted the lengths correctly. I'd see an improvement in my time and wonder whether I had really improved or whether I had just miscounted pool lengths. I couldn't look at the watch while I was swimming, but at least when I finished, I could determine whether I'd counted correctly. It was also a lot easier than calculating my time from the pace clock, and it gave me lots of valuable pacing information.

The watch is available through the Store section of this site.


Bob
Coach Bob

Is this really a watch or a ring? I had looked it up on finis and it looked as if it was a ring. My question would be the issue of sizing. Can you elaborate?

Sherry
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 02-07-2015
terry terry is offline
Head Coach
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 2,305
terry has disabled reputation
Default

I believe it's a ring--it was the last time I checked, which has been a long time. To my recollection, the band is an adjustable fabric one.
I think I'll order one to give it a test.
__________________
Terry Laughlin
Head Coach & Chief Executive Optimist

May your laps be as happy as mine.

My TI Story
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 02-07-2015
Talvi Talvi is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Lappeenranta, Finland
Posts: 1,675
Talvi
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jenson1a View Post
Coach Bob

Is this really a watch or a ring? I had looked it up on finis and it looked as if it was a ring. My question would be the issue of sizing. Can you elaborate?

Sherry
Hi Sherry, it's a ring - see here: http://www.sportcount.com/featureChart.php
__________________
A psychological disorder is: "Any personal construction which is used repeatedly in spite of consistent invalidation."
~ George Kelly

"The water is your friend.....you don't have to fight with water, just share the same spirit as the water, and it will help you move."
~ Aleksandr Popov
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:18 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.