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  #31  
Old 08-17-2018
CoachStuartMcDougal's Avatar
CoachStuartMcDougal CoachStuartMcDougal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dubdub View Post
I forgot to mention, that with the help of the Rangs, I may have succeeded in zeroing in on when the legs sink. When I start the lap, I push off the wall into a superman glide before I start my strokes. I glide about 5 yards or so and my legs do not sink. With my face still in the water and looking directly below me, I do two strokes, my legs don't sink. Then I take a breath and put face back into the water which is when I can feel my legs sink a little. Then I begin to make adjustments to streamline my body, bring my feet back up over the next two strokes with my face still in water.

I need to video my stroke so I can post here for suggestions. I think it may be the way I turn to breath in and put my face back in the water. The mechanics may be wrong throwing my body off balance.

Dubdub
Hi Dub, Being aware of your hips/legs sinking when breathing is excellent, most swimmers have no idea that's actually happening and why swimmers find it so hard to breathe.

This blog outlines a process to help you breathe easy, establish good timing, and maintain posture when rolling to air. Select this link: Breathing It's Overrated

Once you remove all the added terrestrial movement patterns (i.e. looking for the promise land of air) and remove tension in neck, shoulders, chest is when you will find the "easy breath". There really is no breathing stroke and non-breathing stroke, only a seamless breath has become integrated into your stroke.

Good luck and be patient with the process!

Stu
mindbodyandswim.com

Last edited by CoachStuartMcDougal : 08-17-2018 at 06:10 PM.
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  #32  
Old 08-23-2018
dubdub
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachStuartMcDougal View Post
Hi Dub, Being aware of your hips/legs sinking when breathing is excellent, most swimmers have no idea that's actually happening and why swimmers find it so hard to breathe.

This blog outlines a process to help you breathe easy, establish good timing, and maintain posture when rolling to air. Select this link: Breathing It's Overrated

Once you remove all the added terrestrial movement patterns (i.e. looking for the promise land of air) and remove tension in neck, shoulders, chest is when you will find the "easy breath". There really is no breathing stroke and non-breathing stroke, only a seamless breath has become integrated into your stroke.

Good luck and be patient with the process!

Stu
mindbodyandswim.com
Coach Stu,

Your post helped a lot. Right away I noticed this - "Lifting head and rotating more to breathe instinctively triggers the lead arm to push down and legs to splay wide to maintain stability." I'm not so much lifting my head as rotating more. Maybe, I'm breathing in for a second longer than I need to.

I realize that I need to lead with my shoulder and make sure the chin moves with the shoulder. It would help if someone can tell me where my eye should be looking when I breath in. As I breath in the bow wave, would I be looking at a point which is 90 degrees to my right or more like 120-130 degrees to my right ?

I'm making progress though and all these suggestions help !! Thanks everyone

Dubdub
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  #33  
Old 08-23-2018
daveblt daveblt is offline
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Breathe directly to the side with eyes focused to where you are breathing. If you look too much back over your shoulder it could cause you to over roll or your lead hand may cross over too much to your center line. If you look too much ahead it can cause you too lift your head in the breath.

Dave
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  #34  
Old 08-24-2018
Mushroomfloat
 
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I was a fan of looking back towards the shoulder when breathing and if i'm in trouble and really have to make that breath i'll go back towards the shoulder as i know "youll always find air at the tip of your shoulder" to quote Terry.

but looking back also sabotages the front spear and can lead to sending the recovery arm over the back.

So yes straight 90 to the side is best

pirate breathing, one goggle under water splitting face mouth pursed to the side like a pirate saying "arrrrgh" ;)
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  #35  
Old 08-24-2018
Mushroomfloat
 
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Doesn't always work in busy pools with wave chop, but superb in a still flat pool
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  #36  
Old 08-24-2018
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CoachStuartMcDougal CoachStuartMcDougal is offline
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Actually remaining in posture, head low - creating bow wave and low pressure pocket is absolutely necessary when breathing in adverse, lumpy open water conditions too.

Stu
mindbodyandswim.com
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