Total Immersion Forums  

Go Back   Total Immersion Forums > O2 in H20: Breathing Skills
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-02-2012
ALMD ALMD is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 37
ALMD
Default Could this be the cause of our struggling breathing ??

could this be the main reason why we continue to struggle with our breathing when we swim?

that we don't exhale fully when we are under the water ....and we have to keep working on exhaling more if we start to get this feeling that we are out of breath ...and most of what people on this forum were able to accomplish after their struggling with breathing, involved relaxing, bobbing up and down etc , which all ensures that exhaling under the water goes un interrupted.

I realized , and I am sure, a lot of you here noticed that as we are focusing on perfecting each drill to transform to whole stroke ( and there are lots of them for the beginner like me) , we do forget to exhale fully , and thats when the feeling of discomfort that i am out of breath, shortly arrives...

No matter how forcefully we exhaled, we will still have air left in out lungs, so we can't empty our lungs completely of air... ( in medicine it is called residual volume ) ..but we can make sure the largest volume of air is expelled before our mouth clears the water surface to catch a breath.

Hope we will all succeed to breath more comfortable in our swimming
__________________
TI in training
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-02-2012
CoachSuzanne CoachSuzanne is offline
Coach
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 2,453
CoachSuzanne
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ALMD View Post
could this be the main reason why we continue to struggle with our breathing when we swim?

that we don't exhale fully when we are under the water ....and we have to keep working on exhaling more if we start to get this feeling that we are out of breath ...and most of what people on this forum were able to accomplish after their struggling with breathing, involved relaxing, bobbing up and down etc , which all ensures that exhaling under the water goes un interrupted.

I realized , and I am sure, a lot of you here noticed that as we are focusing on perfecting each drill to transform to whole stroke ( and there are lots of them for the beginner like me) , we do forget to exhale fully , and thats when the feeling of discomfort that i am out of breath, shortly arrives...

No matter how forcefully we exhaled, we will still have air left in out lungs, so we can't empty our lungs completely of air... ( in medicine it is called residual volume ) ..but we can make sure the largest volume of air is expelled before our mouth clears the water surface to catch a breath.

Hope we will all succeed to breath more comfortable in our swimming

While there are many who hold their breath, it's also not necessary to fully exhale. There will always be residual volume...trying to create as large a tidal volume as possible prolongs the inhalation phase, which can create it's own issues with balance.

As exertion increases, minute ventilation increases...this occurs via both increased frequency and increased tidal volume. My personal preference is to breath more ferquently while keeping tidal volume minimal to my needs...much like a trumpet player or opera singer. Air is not wasted in singling or trumpet playing and the inhale is quick and reflexive. prolonged inhalations cause interruptions & hesitatiosn in the stroke.

I agree that finding the right balance of all these elements is difficult at best.
__________________
Suzanne Atkinson, MD
Level 3 USAT Coach
USA Paralympic Triathlon Coach
Coach of 5 time USA Triathlon Triathlete of the Year, Kirsten Sass
Steel City Endurance, LTD
Fresh Freestyle

Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-03-2012
ALMD ALMD is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 37
ALMD
Default

thank you

Your feedback is greatly appreciated

For me as a beginner, I feel if I breath frequently with shallow exhalation, it probably will lead to anxiety and tension which exacerbates the problem of holding the breath etc..

For you as an elite TI swimmer and other coaches, it is much easier to change any of the breathing variables, rate or volume or both, but for me as a beginner, I dont think at this stage in my training I can confidently do that..
__________________
TI in training
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-03-2012
CoachSuzanne CoachSuzanne is offline
Coach
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 2,453
CoachSuzanne
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ALMD View Post
thank you

Your feedback is greatly appreciated

For me as a beginner, I feel if I breath frequently with shallow exhalation, it probably will lead to anxiety and tension which exacerbates the problem of holding the breath etc..

For you as an elite TI swimmer and other coaches, it is much easier to change any of the breathing variables, rate or volume or both, but for me as a beginner, I dont think at this stage in my training I can confidently do that..
I would venture to guess that a bigger part of your picutre is staying relaxed. If you are relaxed, you neither need to exhale everything nor take frequent shallow breaths.

If your rate & depth are mismatched with your exertion then yes, you'll get lightheaded & anxious. My suggestion is to neither force a full set of lungs nor a rapid breathing rate.

Swim easily, and use sweet spot breathing if needed to "catch your breath" until you feel calm again and resume your siwmming and/or drilling.

As you continue to gain confidence in your ability to remain relaxed, the technical aspect of breathing will improve, which improves your relaxation and confidence, etc, etc.

I'm not suggesting it's easy...but it's not nearly as complicated as some might think it is. Just...relax.
__________________
Suzanne Atkinson, MD
Level 3 USAT Coach
USA Paralympic Triathlon Coach
Coach of 5 time USA Triathlon Triathlete of the Year, Kirsten Sass
Steel City Endurance, LTD
Fresh Freestyle

Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-03-2012
ALMD ALMD is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 37
ALMD
Default

thank you

Very valuable information in your response.

I always felt being anxious was hindering me when I started. I have gained much more confidence in the water compared to when I started almost 8 weeks ago.

I feel am gaining more confidence which is allowing me to relax more, and this showed in my strokes and breathing today, but still I have to accomplish more in that aspect.

and true, what you said...and like we always say... relax ...relax ...relax....that should be our mantra as we are trying to swim and beat our struggle to breath ...
__________________
TI in training
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-03-2012
Mike from NS Mike from NS is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 551
Mike from NS
Default

ALMD,

Something I've tried that helps me in becoming more used to the breathing timing, and the watery surroundings in general, follows partly from a post by Nicodemus a couple of years ago. All about the bobbing ! What works for me is to go down the lane on my back (fluttering with fins) and bob as I go. I try driving my head to different depths. Breathing out only when under the water - using the air / water interface as my signal when to exhale or inhale. Tilt your head back far enough sometimes to see where you are going. Play with the water. After doing this for a couple of lengths I swim freestyle and can notice better rhythm and control. I'm sure I must have received strange looks from the life guards but this is a fun thing to do and it has helped. See how far you can submerge and over time I think you will become more relaxed. Knowing how to handle the "what ifs" in a different environment will induce more relaxation. (I'm not sure if this is a TI certified drill or not ! ... naw, I'm sure -- it isn't! ) Another thing that helps me is to cork screw through the water for a couple of lengths. Flutter with fins and keep arms at your side or in Superman position for balance. As you roll to air INHALE ! and as you continue the roll ( no pausing - get that bite of air ) to face in the water EXHALE!. Again play with it as I think this too helps with breathing timing. I hope these help.
Mike
__________________
If you're not swimming; then you should be skiing......
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-03-2012
ALMD ALMD is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 37
ALMD
Default

thank you Mike.

I have been experimenting with the bobbing up/ down drill more recently, and I feel its getting me more relaxed in the water and confident to perform my drills much better


thanks again
__________________
TI in training
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-03-2012
Mike from NS Mike from NS is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 551
Mike from NS
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ALMD View Post
thank you Mike.

I have been experimenting with the bobbing up/ down drill more recently, and I feel its getting me more relaxed in the water and confident to perform my drills much better

thanks again
Two Thumbs Up ALMD!!!

It's all about getting used used to the water ! In my case, it has taken way too long - probably because my winters have been for skiing and swimming frequency hasn't been what it should have been. But as time rolls past I'm getting more enjoyment out of swimming and I'm becoming more addicted to the swimming too. Maybe only once a week now but it is at least once a week and not "maybe once or twice over the winter". This has given me more confidence and helped the ability grow as well. Quality takes time and ability takes practice.

Mike

PS - the passion is solid for skiing and it is growing greatly for swimming as well! Both rely on learning good balance.
__________________
If you're not swimming; then you should be skiing......
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 01-04-2012
tab tab is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 171
tab
Default

I find swimming with a group doing various exercises helps in the relax department. But I don't have this opportunity on a regular basis. A swim buddy would help. I wonder how many people have extended relaxation/breathing problems who swim alone? Someone to bounce thing off, methods, observation, and such. The forum does this but it doesn't quite hit it on the personal level.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 03-21-2012
luis9889 luis9889 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 2
luis9889
Default

luis9889
I, too, struggle with breathing as an intermediate swimmer learning the TI method. After a lap, I resort to the breath stroke (which I can sustain without interruption) to catch my breath, to then resume freestyle. From the blogs I've read, it's a skill that can take a long time to master. I breath on alternating strokes, which I find easier. Once I attempt to breath bilaterally, everything comes apart; very frustrating!
Is there a drill(s) to help me overcome my struggle with breathing?
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 08:52 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.