Total Immersion Forums  

Go Back   Total Immersion Forums > Freestyle
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-06-2011
Lawrence Lawrence is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: London, UK
Posts: 804
Lawrence
Default Narrow tracks are better

Or so I have finally concluded. By narrow, I mean parallel but without any conscious attempt to ensure the recovering arm enters the water at a point wider than would otherwise be the case, while nevertheless spearing forwards.

Pros: (1) It feels better. (2) You get more oompf from the angled re-entry and extension of the lead arm (what Terry has called the 'squirt forwards').

Cons: (1) Perhaps a greater risk of spearing off the rails.

What clinched it for me is that despite a lot of practice aimed at getting the tracks as wide as possible while parallel and pointing forwards, narrower tracks are what I would choose to do if swimming for pleasure. I can breathe easily either way but only narrow tracks make me feel I'm swimming as nature intended.

Caveat: I don't know how narrow 'narrow' is. All I know is that it's narrower than the maximum width possible consistent with parallel and forward spearing.

Takers?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 11-06-2011
borate borate is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 533
borate
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lawrence View Post
Caveat: I don't know how narrow 'narrow' is. All I know is that it's narrower than the maximum width possible consistent with parallel and forward spearing.
"Wide/narrow tracks" strike me as ambiguous terms. Perhaps aiming for a straight trajectory - recovery through entry - would be more descriptive.

Or suggesting that entry should occur at shoulder width.

Last edited by borate : 11-06-2011 at 04:45 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 11-06-2011
arunks arunks is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 133
arunks
Default

Regarding the "narrow tracks or wide tracks during re entry" is best answered in this article, look at point number 6.
But what are your views on point 4 on stroke length, where they talk about dead spots and say that the "lead hand should always be in motion, either extending forwards, tipping, catching or pulling.It should never just sit there dead, doing nothing." What does dead mean here? How does this align with TI?

Last edited by arunks : 11-06-2011 at 06:29 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 11-06-2011
borate borate is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 533
borate
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by arunks View Post
What are your views on point 4 on stroke length, where they talk about dead spots and say that the "lead hand should always be in motion, either extending forwards, tipping, catching or pulling." <snip> What does dead mean here? How does this align with TI?
See this. And, from a related thread, Terry wrote as follows...

"With regard to the Patient Hand, the intended benefit is twofold:

1) That you begin the stroke deliberately enough that you trap calm water behind your hand and forearm--before the weight shift begins the dynamic part of the stroke.
If your hand is sufficiently patient in starting the stroke, you greatly increase the chances that the weight shift will move your body forward. If you not, chances are greater that the weight shift will move your arm back instead.

2) To more closely synchronize the moment when you begin applying pressure to when the weight shift happens. This minimizes work done by arm and shoulder muscles, drawing power instead from the weight shift."
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 11-06-2011
Lawrence Lawrence is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: London, UK
Posts: 804
Lawrence
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by borate View Post
"Wide/narrow tracks" strike me as ambiguous terms. Perhaps aiming for a straight trajectory - recovery through entry - would be more descriptive.

Or suggesting that entry should occur at shoulder width.
'Wide' and 'narrow' are indeed imprecise, although 'widest consistent with spearing parallel and forwards' isn't, and I know I prefer to go narrower than that.

A straight recovery trajectory sounds good although (i) I don't think people do that, when you look closely and (ii) when you're in the water it's virtually impossible to say with confidence 'I am recovering with a straight trajectory'. In contrast, it isn't hard to tell when the width of the tracks is being varied.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 11-06-2011
Lawrence Lawrence is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: London, UK
Posts: 804
Lawrence
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by arunks View Post
Regarding the "narrow tracks or wide tracks during re entry" is best answered in this article, look at point number 6.
But what are your views on point 4 on stroke length, where they talk about dead spots and say that the "lead hand should always be in motion, either extending forwards, tipping, catching or pulling.It should never just sit there dead, doing nothing." What does dead mean here? How does this align with TI?
As I've said before, 'dead spots' is one of those phrases you hear a lot but which doesn't seem to mean much.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 11-06-2011
DesertDog DesertDog is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Albuquerque, NM
Posts: 88
DesertDog
Default What is "tipping"

Quote:
Originally Posted by arunks View Post
Regarding the "narrow tracks or wide tracks during re entry" is best answered in this article, look at point number 6.
"lead hand should always be in motion, either extending forwards, tipping, catching or pulling.
What do they mean by tipping?
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 11-07-2011
arunks arunks is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 133
arunks
Default

@Borate Thank you for sharing those posts.
@DesertDog I think Tipping means wrists facing downwards, as shown in the pic.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 02:21 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.