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  #1  
Old 01-31-2009
Jamwhite Jamwhite is offline
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Default TI Channels on YouTube

If you would like to see people swimming the different styles TI style, here are the three TI channels that I am familiar with on YouTube:

http://www.youtube.com/user/tiswim

http://www.youtube.com/user/tiswimjapan

http://www.youtube.com/user/TotalImmersionIsrael

http://www.youtube.com/user/SeahikerVideo

http://www.youtube.com/user/Flianbrian

Last edited by Jamwhite : 01-31-2009 at 12:56 AM. Reason: Added another channel
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  #2  
Old 01-31-2009
Richardsk Richardsk is offline
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Hello

In my opinion the best of these are Shinji Takeuchi's videos on tiswimjapan. It is particularly useful to read the queries and replies. Almost like having your personal TI coach.

There is of course a lot of interesting stuff in the other videos.
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  #3  
Old 02-01-2009
CoachShinji CoachShinji is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richardsk View Post
In my opinion the best of these are Shinji Takeuchi's videos on tiswimjapan. It is particularly useful to read the queries and replies. Almost like having your personal TI coach.
Thanks, Richardsk. Some people who posted questions do not know about TI. So I try to describe the TI theory as easily as possible. If they knew Skating and ZipperSwitch, it would be easier for me to answer any kinds of questions.
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Freestyle Demo (#2 ranking worldwide on YouTube)
Graceful Freestyle
9 Stroke Freestyle
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  #4  
Old 02-01-2009
Richardsk Richardsk is offline
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Shinji

You are doing a great job. I am still working on reducing my strokes per length and now occasionally manage sixteen strokes for 25m in about 38 seonds, which is slow, but I am slow in all strokes.

I must do more skating and spear switch and zipper switch I suppose.
I now have a tempo trainer and find it very interesting. I have still not really got used to it. It is interesting how sometimes one can speed up the tempo and not go any faster and then sometimes slow the tempo down and go the same speed.
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  #5  
Old 02-04-2009
Adam Adam is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richardsk View Post
Shinji
I now have a tempo trainer and find it very interesting. I have still not really got used to it. It is interesting how sometimes one can speed up the tempo and not go any faster and then sometimes slow the tempo down and go the same speed.
The following is in hebrew, but it might still help:

Advanced Freestyle Drills - Tempo Trainer.

Last edited by Adam : 02-04-2009 at 07:37 AM. Reason: bad link
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  #6  
Old 02-04-2009
Richardsk Richardsk is offline
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Thanks Brian

That looks very useful. I will of course need to use different settings to adapt it to my speed and stroke rate. Nice swimming in that video! One can almost get the impression of a swimmer swimming crawl with a dolphin kick when two kicks synchronize. Actually I quite like swimming 'butterfree' as some call it.
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Old 02-07-2009
Richardsk Richardsk is offline
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I should of course have said thanks, Adam. My brain seems to have played a trick on me.

I have to report that I tried out some Tempo Trainer sets at the pool today with interesting but inconclusive results. I started out swimming 25 repeats with a setting of 1:65, taking about four beeps for the push-off and seventeen, eighteen or nineteen strokes. If I had synchronized perfectly with the beeps the theoretical time for four beeps and seventeen strokes according to my spreadsheet would have been 34.65 , and four beeps and nineteen strokes would have been 37.95. I was doing about 38 (I can't read the small figures on my stopwatch without glasses so I just use rounded figures).

I then gradually reduced the setting first to 1:60 and then 1:55, 1:50 and 1:45 without seeing any real increase in speed. In fact most repeats were in the 37 to 38 area. I think I may have managed one at 36 or so.

The lowest I got today was a setting of 1:35 with a stroke count of something like 21 and I think I managed a time of 35 at that setting but then the times began to get slower again and when I found that I wasn't really swimming any faster I decided to start moving up again.

Perhaps for the time being swimming with the very slow cadence is the best line to follow, trying to gradually increase the stroke rate without adding too many strokes?

Another line I have followed its to start at something like 1:10 and try to work down to 0:80, at which my stroke starts to fall apart and it's time to move up again. This gives a time of around 30 secs for 25m. Slow I know, but one must work with what one has.
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  #8  
Old 02-08-2009
Jamwhite Jamwhite is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richardsk View Post
I started out swimming 25 repeats with a setting of 1:65, taking about four beeps for the push-off and seventeen, eighteen or nineteen strokes.
When I put on the tempo-timer, the first thing that I do is swim a 100 because the beeping makes me tense up and I have to make myself relax again.

You may want to lower your stroke count before trying to improve your cadence. 19 is alot of strokes for a 25. If that is not your normal stroke count, you may want to start working on speed without it. Any easier method to begin improving speed is to use swim golf.

Cross a length at your comfortable strokes per length. When you get that number, do a TI exercise, then focus on that exercise's focal point and try to cross the pool again in that many strokes. Repeat. It should get easier and easier _that_ practice. Next practice, reset you expectation and start again. Pretty soon, you should drop a few strokes.

Once you can consistently cross in x-strokes. Instead of trying to swim faster, try streamlining faster (quicker hip rotation) that will likely drop you stroke count quickly.

Here is the reason why I think this is useful. When I cross in my normal 12-14 strokes, I swim a 50 in 40 seconds. When I push myself to stretch out to my lowest SPL of 8-9, then I do a 50 in 50 seconds for significantly less energy.

When my 8-9 SPL time decreases, then 12-14 SPL time always decreases more.
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  #9  
Old 02-08-2009
Richardsk Richardsk is offline
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Hi Jamwhite

You are obviously at a more advanced level than I am. My best ever stroke count for 25 m is 16. When I started swimming the TI way I was doing about 30 strokes per length. I can now normally do 18 and often 17 but it easily rises to 19 or even 20.

You are probably right that I should concentrate on swimming at a slow pace and reducing my stroke count.

I think one also has to try swimming as fast as one can and trying to observe at which points the stroke starts to break down.

I hope to swim a 100m race in less than 2 minutes one of these days. The top swimmers in my age group are recording times of 1:14, 1:17, 1:21 etc., so I have a way to go.

Next year I move up an age group and the bottom time is 1:40 or so so the task is perhaps a little less daunting, even allowing for the fact that I will be a year older. Of course the referee may call time before then ;-)
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  #10  
Old 02-08-2009
Jamwhite Jamwhite is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richardsk View Post
I think one also has to try swimming as fast as one can and trying to observe at which points the stroke starts to break down.
May I suggest that perhaps your speed issue is primarily philosophical? I cannot imagine any advantage to testing stroke's breaking point.

I have found what breaks my stroke down but it is more by accident than design. For me, fatique, tension, and dehydration are all things that will break down my stroke, and I attempt to avoid all three.

The only reason that I use my tempo timer is to elevate tension. When I started training for the 100y sprint, my natural impulse was to tense up and pull faster. My times while doing this were a struggling 45 seconds per 50.

Because both tension and pulling faster seemed to me the opposite of good swimming, used my tempo timer to find a pace that I could swim a more relaxed stroke at 45 seconds. Because the tempo let me basically keep my speed the same, I was able to practice relaxing at speed instead of simply trying to exhaust myself by swimming fast. When I swim at a specific tempo, I know how fast I will cross the pool, so that it taken out of the equation, I just work on focal points and being streamlined for as long as possible at that stroke-rate.

I think that if you changed your mental focus from breaking your stroke to working on elimination skills (trying to skate further in every drill), that you will easily be able to reach your 2 minute 100 without breaking a sweat.
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