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  #1  
Old 09-27-2017
efdoucette efdoucette is offline
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efdoucette
Default Tension, Relax, Taut

Reduce tension ... be relaxed ... but stay taut.

Release head, relax neck, face, hands, shoulders, ankles. Keep core taut.
Drive hand to target, stay patient, slow pull, quick recovery.

I don't have a question, just a conundrum, so many conflicting forces.

Tall order eh!
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  #2  
Old 09-27-2017
CoachBobM CoachBobM is offline
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It takes great effort to be effortless.


Bob
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  #3  
Old 09-27-2017
scribe3 scribe3 is offline
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Default tension

I have actually, started doing yoga, because the stretching helps me, with the pelvic tilt to engage my glutes and core during swimming. lower back tension seems to be my problem
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  #4  
Old 09-27-2017
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CoachStuartMcDougal CoachStuartMcDougal is offline
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Hi efdoucette,

It's not that there are conflicting forces or a conundrum, but rather the language being used. I've heard advice keeping core very *taut* many times before. That word implies tension, tight - something just short of rigid. Instead use "tone core" in context of posture -shifting/position pelvis in line with spine, neck and head as Scribe noted. When the limbs are soft and fluid, easily move - maintains a toned core (posture). When limbs are rigid, tense (turning arms, beating legs) - it will bend the spine of the most "Rocky taut" of cores, going soft (not taut) in the middle.

Stu
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  #5  
Old 09-27-2017
Danny Danny is offline
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Pulled my back out last week. I can walk just fine but getting up and down out of chairs is very tough. A preview of things to come in my old age. My standard recipe is to tense up the muscles in my pelvic area to support my spine when getting out of the chair, and that helps, but lately I am noticing that I have less pain with less work when I take a moment before getting up to make sure everything is aligned and in balance before I stand. There's no substitute for balance. Tension is the next best option when you are out of balance and trying to hold your position, but balance should be option number 1. Balance is not just something static. The hardest part of balance is the dynamic part.

In swimming as well as in getting out of chairs.
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  #6  
Old 09-28-2017
scribe3 scribe3 is offline
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Sometimes,I see people swim a couple laps, and then grab a pool buey and I wonder if there tired of bracing there gluteus and core, or are they working on another focal point and not wanting to worry about balance
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  #7  
Old 09-28-2017
CoachBobM CoachBobM is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scribe3 View Post
Sometimes,I see people swim a couple laps, and then grab a pool buey and I wonder if there tired of bracing there gluteus and core, or are they working on another focal point and not wanting to worry about balance
It shouldn't require effort to stay balanced. Their problem may be that they've never learned to be balanced and therefore require a pull buoy in order to stay horizontal when they're not swimming at full speed.


Bob
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  #8  
Old 09-29-2017
bujanglokal
 
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from efdoucette ...." slow pull, quick recovery. "

what is the reasoning for slow pull?
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  #9  
Old 09-29-2017
sclim sclim is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachBobM View Post
It shouldn't require effort to stay balanced. Their problem may be that they've never learned to be balanced and therefore require a pull buoy in order to stay horizontal when they're not swimming at full speed.


Bob
I share the reluctance to use devices or toys that might get in the way of technique. But could there be a use for a small pull buoy if one is trying to get passive horizontal balance so as to practice trunk rotation without using kick, nor arms, but only using core?
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  #10  
Old 09-30-2017
efdoucette efdoucette is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bujanglokal View Post
from efdoucette ...." slow pull, quick recovery. "

what is the reasoning for slow pull?
As I understand the theory, and I may be wrong, it's about grip. If your pull moves faster backwards than your torso moves forward then your grip is slipping = waste. In relation, your recovery should be quick forward to assist forward / aft balance. Hope this makes sense. And again, I may be wrong, I'm absolutely not qualified to give swim advice.
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