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  #11  
Old 11-14-2017
daveblt daveblt is offline
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Here is a good video that shows you a good way to help keep the legs up when swimming freestyle .The same can be applied to superman glide. I think I posted this video here last year.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oW5nE5FBPsQ
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  #12  
Old 11-14-2017
aswimmerINmaryland
 
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Default That guy and his props are so funny!

Thanks for reminding us about this video. I am going to have to try some of his drills, because although I used to do Pilates, and consider myself to have a strong core, I don't seem to be translating that to swimming most of the time.

I get a big kick out of the hats/props he uses. I think that he kind of misses some points in his discussion about the physics involved (he says where center of gravity typically is but omits to say where center of bouyancy is I think, and there are a few other nitpicks) but, overall he does a helpful video.
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  #13  
Old 11-14-2017
Danny Danny is offline
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It's perhaps worth mentioning that the film posted here has been extensively discussed on this forum in the past and there are some very critical views of what he is saying. This is technical stuff and may not be of interest to beginners, but anyone who is interested can search on this forum for the name Shaules (the author of the film) to fine the discussions.
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  #14  
Old 11-14-2017
aswimmerINmaryland
 
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Point taken. I didn't think he was suggesting ARCHING the back, but rather, paying attention to the muscle tension in the lower back. I was thinking that the Pilates exercises like "swimming" (lying on the stomach, raising shoulders and legs off the floor, and raising and lowering opposite arm and leg, then lowering again) would be helpful in strengthening those muscles. I am still under the impression anyway, that core and back strength can be helpful in swimming with legs that don't drag.
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  #15  
Old 11-15-2017
daveblt daveblt is offline
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This video helped me out .All the years I've been swimming I thought I was fairly well balanced but it seemed that my legs felt a little heavy at times with a mind of their own . Now my balance feels better and my 2 beat kick is easier. I was doing all the tricks for many years for finding balance such as keeping the head down, hand below elbow, leaning in to the water, ect. but I was not really finding perfect balance through my core to my legs. This video makes sense to me .For people who seem to find balance easy and can float well this may not apply as much.

Dave
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  #16  
Old 11-15-2017
Danny Danny is offline
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Here is a video from an expert on the type of core strength needed for good freestyle. Note that, instead of emphasizing back muscles, Richard Quick is emphasizing the pelvic muscles to hold the spine straight and aligned. This approach is very different from the one recommended in Shaules' film.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5V5PYspkknE
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  #17  
Old 11-15-2017
Danny Danny is offline
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I think there are several objections that one can raise to Shaules' approach to posture. To me, the factor that he is missing is that freestyle requires core stability while rotating from one side to the other. It is not enough to simply keep your legs up while lying on your stomach. It turns out that the pelvic muscles are precisely the muscles needed to stabilize and transmit hip rotation to the shoulders, which is what powers the freestyle stroke.

That said, I don't think it's a good idea to take anyone's word on these things, just because they are an expert. I would try both approaches and see what suits you best. Sometimes, as your swim technique evolves, your perception of these issues may change, and if you feel Shaules' recommendations help you more than those of Richard Quick, then I would go with them. Just keep in mind that at some later point you my want to revisit Quick's approach and see if it starts to make more sense to you.
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  #18  
Old 11-16-2017
daveblt daveblt is offline
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[quote=Danny;63885]I think there are several objections that one can raise to Shaules' approach to posture. To me, the factor that he is missing is that freestyle requires core stability while rotating from one side to the other. It is not enough to simply keep your legs up while lying on your stomach. It turns out that the pelvic muscles are precisely the muscles needed to stabilize and transmit hip rotation to the shoulders, which is what powers the freestyle stroke.QUOTE]


If you watch the video again Shaules does mention about shifting your weight to the pelvis.

Dave
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  #19  
Old 11-16-2017
aswimmerINmaryland
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Danny View Post
Here is a video from an expert on the type of core strength needed for good freestyle. Note that, instead of emphasizing back muscles, Richard Quick is emphasizing the pelvic muscles to hold the spine straight and aligned. This approach is very different from the one recommended in Shaules' film.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5V5PYspkknE
So much of his dryland work is reminiscent of Pilates mat work, to me. It's all in the Powerhouse, that's what Joseph Pilates taught, and that's just what Richard Quick is talking about. Those moves are so easy LOOKING, but often really tough to do well!
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  #20  
Old 11-21-2017
Mike from NS Mike from NS is offline
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I tried using the pull buoy as mentioned earlier in the thread -- as Shinji had suggested I should. In about only 20 minutes of continuous push off from the wall, the glide distance with the pull buoy increased by about 10 feet over the distance when I started. Without the pull buoy the glide distance increase was only about 3 feet. This tells me my legs were still lower than desirable and more practice needs to be done. With this practice I can see improvement coming.
Mike
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