Total Immersion Forums  

Go Back   Total Immersion Forums > Freestyle
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 11-19-2017
Mike from NS Mike from NS is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 551
Mike from NS
Default

Hi Cathy,

Three points ; 1) at 40, in relation to some of us here, you are still a kid ... so, enjoy your youth ! 2) As was pointed out and was suggested to me many times over the years when asking people here questions ... relaxing when in the water is more your friend than you might believe. Really hard to do when starting out so maybe better to try to lessen tension that think of it as trying to relax. Spend some time just floating. 3) My main suggestion is to take a breath, go beneath the surface and hum,,,, hum a song if that helps. I think you will find that this may promote trickle breathing from your nose. Another thing that was suggested to me many moons ago was to bob in the water to get a feeling of a breathing pattern. Just take small steps and soon enough you will find you are relaxing and breathing out mostly through your nose in an easy and controlled pattern. If a nose clip works give it a try as a last resort, if you must.

Best of luck ... and never consider giving up.
Mike
__________________
If you're not swimming; then you should be skiing......
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 11-19-2017
whoiscathy
 
Posts: n/a
Default Ommmmm

Alright, I'll try hummmmming Oooooommmmmm now in the bathtub :)) For real!

_____
I "just" float actually much of the time because that's about all I can do ;).

And skate, now I can skate too. And I'm starting to be able to rotate my torso in whatever angle I want to and be stable there. I actually went from "SG too easy, I'm bored, let's skate, wait, WT* is this???" to "let's skate all day long, super cool!" during last week.

When it comes to arm strokes, they *** my brain, though. And when it comes to kicking I have no idea what I'm doing. :P I have too many limbs!
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 11-19-2017
novaswimmer novaswimmer is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 228
novaswimmer
Default

For what it's worth...Forget the bathtub or a basin of water.

I would go to about 4 feet of water in the pool, stand up, then squat under water. As you go down, hum to let air out slowly, deliberately. Start to breathe out before you submerge though. Do NOT breathe in underwater. Mouth should be closed. When you feel you have breathed out 80% of your air or so, stand up. You should still be breathing out a bit as you come above the water. Otherwise, you may panic and try to inhale underwater, not good. Since you're not 'swimming' or Superman Gliding, so there should be no other distractions other than to concentrate on breathing. Continue bobs like this until they become comfortable. No exertion. It may take weeks in your case. Do it until they feel second nature and until you feel like you're not going to get water in your nose. Next, go to deeper water and try this again. This is something that kids who go to the pool early in life learn quickly, but for adults who swim later in life, or who have some fears of water, have to learn.

If you can manage exhaling a continuous, smooth, not over-forced, stream of air through the nose and maintain a constant positive pressure in your nasal cavity, you should NOT get water into your nose. If you are getting water in your nose, then you have stopped the exhale for some reason, and the positive pressure of the water has overcome the pressure in your nasal cavity. You must learn to sense when this happens.

Can you tell, when you breathe, whether air is coming out BOTH nostrils fairly evenly? I ask because some people happen to have physical limitations, like a nasal blockage or polyps, and that could certainly affect your breathing. Do you?

Once you master this in an upright position in deep water, you can try exhaling in a glide position. Stand up before you complete your exhale.

Do you have fears of the water so that you panic? That can take a while to overcome.

The whole TI thing is to isolate individual facets of swimming until they become second nature. Move on to the next, and then bring them together. You might just have to work on this breathing thing by itself for a while.

Last edited by novaswimmer : 11-19-2017 at 06:11 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 11-19-2017
WFEGb WFEGb is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Hamburg
Posts: 1,104
WFEGb
Default

Hello Cathy,

similar to Danny I'd suggest to seperate your problems. Have in mind integrated breathing is the very last of TI's BSP-pyramid.

So first I think you should find a noseclip not too painful and swim the TI-drills without disturbing your foci with water in your nose.

Second I think you should offer yourself some hours(!) to get used to your nose in water without water in your nose.

- Start at the pools edge, vertical body, nostrils down take a deep inhale, shut your mouth and push yourself down slowly how far possible without incoming water?

- Can you hold the threshold-position some seconds? Some seconds more?

- Even 2mm deeper?

- What happens, if you open your mouth (below surface)?

- Can you find a position with open mouth with no water in? Will it allow you 2mm deeper?

- What happens, if you start exhaling as slow as possible through your nose (open and closed mouth, exhaling initiated from your diaphragm not from your throat)? Do you earn 2mm deeper?

If you're able to do it with head fully submerged, without pain and some secure Feeling you're able to do, integrate some rhythm. 1/3 inhale 2/3 exhale below surface...

BTW I don't know anyone who was able to swim like Shinji in just two hours (included himself :-) )

So most important. Play around and enjoy your (hopefully) TI-way.

Best regards,
Werner
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 11-19-2017
whoiscathy
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by novaswimmer View Post
Can you tell, when you breathe, whether air is coming out BOTH nostrils fairly evenly? I ask because some people happen to have physical limitations, like a nasal blockage or polyps, and that could certainly affect your breathing. Do you?
We checked underwater. Both nostrils work. I'm not aware of any polyps.

Quote:

Do you have fears of the water so that you panic? That can take a while to overcome.
No, I actually like to be in the water. Also, I got myself into troubles before and survived those. Even a rip current in Costa Rica last year: that was actually the last push for me to really learn how to swim properly because it was such a pain to swim back on my back! I think I got out of that one only because I'd read about rip currents just the evening before so I didn't panic too bad.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 11-19-2017
whoiscathy
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WFEGb View Post
BTW I don't know anyone who was able to swim like Shinji in just two hours (included himself :-) )

D@ngit! :))
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 11-19-2017
whoiscathy
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Let's see...

Quote:
Originally Posted by WFEGb View Post
... you should offer yourself some hours(!) to get used to your nose in water without water in your nose.

- Start at the pools edge, vertical body, nostrils down take a deep inhale, shut your mouth and push yourself down slowly how far possible without incoming water?
I like to sit down on the floor in the shallow end. By the way I'm not really able to sit down on my own unless I push against the lane separator thing (Eng name ???) even if I exhale forcefully! And I'm skinny! Still, I just float up :)

Quote:
- Can you hold the threshold-position some seconds? Some seconds more?
I can sit on the bottom for some 10-15 seconds (if I push against that lane separator thingy, that is, otherwise I float up). I can watch my bubbles and sit there, but I wouldn't call it light exhaling. A fellow swimmer checked my bubbles and confirmed they were coming from both nostrils but told me also that I was exhaling too strongly. Of course because if I exhaled any less, water would come in again. Duh.

Quote:
- What happens, if you open your mouth (below surface)?

- Can you find a position with open mouth with no water in? Will it allow you 2mm deeper?
This thought scares me :) I already swallow so much water I puke all day. If I open my mouth will I swallow more?

Quote:
- What happens, if you start exhaling as slow as possible through your nose (open and closed mouth, exhaling initiated from your diaphragm not from your throat)? Do you earn 2mm deeper?
This is a good question; I have no idea where I initiate it. I'll check next time...
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 11-19-2017
WFEGb WFEGb is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Hamburg
Posts: 1,104
WFEGb
Default

Hello Cathy,

first, you're one of the very lucky floaters, even when exhaled (sure, you exhaled totally, not with any safe rest of air, nose closed with fingers?)!

What I'd tried to say is, take some time and find your threshold of comfort mm for mm and then try to expand it mm for mm...

With time you'll find a feeling for the needed pressure from diaphragm to nostrils where your head will be totally submerged and it's not necessary to exhale any bubbles. Just holding your breath. No diffference with open or closed mouth. Take it as exploration not as anything that has to change in seconds. Holding yourself down on rope-line (not sure how it's called correctly) or on the pool's edge allows you adjustments mm for mm. Be aware how your needed force to hold you down changes, if you exhale...

Do not run against your fears! Play with your thresholds of comfort!

Best regards,
Werner
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 11-19-2017
whoiscathy
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WFEGb View Post
Hello Cathy,

first, you're one of the very lucky floaters, even when exhaled (sure, you exhaled totally, not with any safe rest of air, nose closed with fingers?)!
I don't think I exhaled everything but most of it and I still had to push/keep myself down. I also tried to lie down on the bottom of the pool, which was impossible. I float up.

I'm under the impression that I wouldn't even be able to properly drown (=sink to the bottom of the pool for a lifeguard to have to bring me up). I'd just float on top, like wet spaghetti :)

Quote:

No difference with open or closed mouth. (...)
Open mouth underwater, interesting. I saw Terry having his mouth open in some videos and I kept wondering how, and why, but I never felt like trying it.

I'll try some of these tips - and also suggestions from others - tomorrow. Merci!
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 11-19-2017
whoiscathy
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Maybe I should explain this floating vs sinking more in detail.

At the first lesson, I was told "you have the best SG I've seen". Sure enough I can stay in a SG seemingly "forever" and if I'm given just a little momentum I can easily float to halfway into the pool (25m pool) or even longer.

But I didn't tell my coach one thing: I was holding my breath... I didn't actually know I was supposed to exhale... ;)

Then I read somewhere (I think on SwimSmooth) that you have to exhale constantly when the face is in the water and then I started to do just that. One week later I was told my SG was worse and that I was sinking more. I was like, huh, I've been practicing it :O Haha! :))

Then I Googled more and put it together. I realized it was a decent idea to exhale (doctors recommend it, as I read it) but probably not at that rate as I was doing it. Then I attempted to regulate how much, only to figure out I seem to have little to no control over that (so far).
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 11:35 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.