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  #11  
Old 12-06-2017
Mushroomfloat
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ti97 View Post
Werner, Back in the early days, Terry said in his workshop that Balance is "sinking evenly"
What like when you exhale to empty in streamline you should sink level?
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  #12  
Old 12-06-2017
Mushroomfloat
 
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Oh Yeah! v

https://youtu.be/YwOHzq8Qgso
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  #13  
Old 12-06-2017
daveblt daveblt is offline
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Originally Posted by bx View Post
The game-changer for me in finally keeping my legs up was:
1. engaged glutes
2. relaxed knees

And my current focus is:
3. relaxed (floppy) ankles

This seems to make even a tiny toe-flick 2bk even more effective in keeping legs up.
About the same for me. Last year when I first saw and posted a video from coach Shaules of synergy swimming about how to keep your legs up is when my balance improved even more. I started thinking more of engaging my glutes and lower back muscles in addition to my usual swimming techniques techniques for balance and now my legs don't seem to have a mind of their own.

Dave
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  #14  
Old 12-06-2017
Tom Pamperin Tom Pamperin is offline
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Dave,

I completely agree about the need to do more to keep legs up--the head is a good starting point for balance, though, and often a dramatic game-changing moment.

For me, sinking the chest and maintaining a certain productive tension in my core (maybe glutes as well, though I haven't been mindful of that yet) helps my legs float higher. Relaxed legs too, as bx noted.
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  #15  
Old 12-07-2017
scribe3 scribe3 is offline
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I wanted to wait until my next vist to the pool, to reply to all of you guy's comments, so today, I started out in the superman glide, and brace my glutes and core, after a moment or so I attempt to relax my neck, and remember where my arms were in relation to my body. Then I squeeze my shoulders together and took a few strokes, it felt a lot different

Still, balance is going to be a work in progress for a while

I think apart of my problem is, as "Mushroomfloat stated my arms, were not below my lungs{4 clock}
Also, I think I need to forcus more on tension in the core and glutes

I just wanted to thank all you guy's for you suggestions
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  #16  
Old 12-07-2017
Mushroomfloat
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scribe3 View Post
I wanted to wait until my next vist to the pool, to reply to all of you guy's comments, so today, I started out in the superman glide, and brace my glutes and core, after a moment or so I attempt to relax my neck, and remember where my arms were in relation to my body. Then I squeeze my shoulders together and took a few strokes, it felt a lot different

Still, balance is going to be a work in progress for a while

I think apart of my problem is, as "Mushroomfloat stated my arms, were not below my lungs{4 clock}
Also, I think I need to forcus more on tension in the core and glutes

I just wanted to thank all you guy's for you suggestions
I spreared too high for months, i used to be exhaused and think how can i ever swim like this?
I was basically swimming up hill & putting the brakes on with every stroke!

If your going to spear right under the surface then you need to be stretched long and level, but then the catch becomes very high with extreme EVF
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  #17  
Old 12-07-2017
Mushroomfloat
 
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Have a look at this TI video

https://youtu.be/VPKahXTq6TE
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  #18  
Old 12-07-2017
sclim sclim is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bx View Post
The game-changer for me in finally keeping my legs up was:
1. engaged glutes
2.relaxed knees

And my current focus is:
3. relaxed (floppy) ankles

This seems to make even a tiny toe-flick 2bk even more effective in keeping legs up.
Could you elaborate a little on how the relaxed knees makes the legs go up. I understand the engaged glutes part.

Is it something to do with before the over-active knees weren't doing a proper propulsive kick, so was actually hindering propulsion and balance, adding drag etc. So just stopping that was helping. Or was there something about the action with relaxed knees that is actively helping to raise the legs?

Last edited by sclim : 12-07-2017 at 08:56 PM.
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  #19  
Old 12-07-2017
daveblt daveblt is offline
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[quote=sclim;64104]Could you elaborate a little on how the relaxed knees makes the legs go up. I understand the engaged glutes part.

That's just it. With the glutes engaged through the lower back muscles along with the usual TI techniques for balance your knees and legs should feel lighter without the feeling that your legs are going to drop.


dave
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  #20  
Old 12-08-2017
bx bx is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sclim View Post
Could you elaborate a little on how the relaxed knees makes the legs go up. I understand the engaged glutes part.

Is it something to do with before the over-active knees weren't doing a proper propulsive kick, so was actually hindering propulsion and balance, adding drag etc. So just stopping that was helping. Or was there something about the action with relaxed knees that is actively helping to raise the legs?
Fair question. It's a little difficult to remember past experiences, but when I used to keep my legs more rigid, like two planks of wood, I tended to pull them down when engaging my core, like a "pike". Also, with relaxed knees (just a little bit off locked-out), I find it helps me engage my core better.

In general in swimming, it seems to me that the core is engaged, but peripheral joints are looser. - Another example is the spearing arm - I spear forwards and feel the stretch in my lat, but deliberately avoid locking-out my elbow and having a rigid arm. - And with the recovering arm - again - the lat stretches, but the elbow remains loose.

It's all very personal, and my goodness, it took me a long time to find balance. There are some swimmers for whom spearing deep and hanging the head are simply not enough.

PS
Agree with daveblt - engaging the glutes has a very good effect of controlling the legs and greatly reducing unwanted wiggles. This is mentioned somewhere in TI materials, but it's worth emphasising it, especially for newer swimmers, IMHO. Controls wobbles, flattens lower back a touch, and we all have under-active glutes anyway!

PPS
Personally, I don't deliberately try to engage lower back to bring up the legs a la Shaules. I don't really know what my lower back muscles are doing...

Last edited by bx : 12-08-2017 at 01:48 AM.
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