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Old 08-24-2012
tony0000 tony0000 is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Detroit, MI
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachDavidShen View Post
What is reasonably low SPL? Lots of factors determine SPL. I am 5'7" so my SPL is naturally higher than others who are taller. As for data points, I am currently swimming about 16-19 SPL for 25y at about 1s tempo depending on the day. Is that good or bad? It's actually where I ended up and stopped stressing about SPL for a while because I needed to work on my left spear body driven propulsion aspects - Still, someday after I get to some level of improvement with my left side spear body propulsion, I'll go back to stressing about SPL again.
Yes, you're right that height and other factors are relevant to SPL, and therefore SPL is an swimmer-relative as tempo and speed. I guess this is what is in the back of my mind: If one's SPL rises to about the SPL would one get swimming a standard crawl, and if one's tempo rises to about what one would swim when doing a standard crawl, and if the tempo is high enough so that amount of time the lead hand extends in the water after the recovery hand has exited the water (at the thigh) is negligible, isn't one swimming pretty close to doing a standard crawl? My questions in this thread have been implicitly based on the fact that I do not believe I am in shape to swim a standard crawl for a long (mile or two) distance. And I'm at an age where gains in stamina and strength do not come easily. So I've looked to TI to find a more suitable and sustainable speed/distance/energy trade-off for me (which hopefully will allow me to breath bilaterally since I like doing that). But I certainly applaud your efforts to improve along multiple dimensions simultaneously, rather than just finding your personal sweet spot.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachDavidShen View Post
I think we disagree on Sun Yang's video. Despite high tempo, he still exhibits a patient lead hand. Given the high tempo, such things are VERY hard to see - and freeze framing or frame by frame viewing on a web streamed Youtube video is hard to do.

In this video, you can see Coach Dave Cameron's stroke - at a slower tempo, you can see his patient lead hand very clearly.

Here are two other Shinji videos:

How To Swim Freestyle by Shinji Takeuchi - Acceleration

How To Swim Freestyle by Shinji Takeuchi - Recovery
I believe a frame-by-frame analysis of Sun Yang's stroke was done on the Swim Smooth site a while back (and discussed in this forum) that showed that his lead hand rested no more than a few 100th of a second. He certainly was not waiting until his recovery hand entered the water.
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