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Old 04-29-2016
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CoachStuartMcDougal CoachStuartMcDougal is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2012
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CoachStuartMcDougal
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Hi Joel!

You're welcome! It was great having you out again with the squad - you have improved tremendously since the last time I (we) saw you. Stop by more often!

The jump and flight off the wall, holding a line and tone body is not only great practice for those that race but also adding your skill of balance from middle. Holding that line swimmers will discover flaws in balance since the hands and feet want to move to stabilize the vessel. You did the flight on your right and left edges with face down (off of your stomach). You can also do face up (off your back); push off on your edge, appx 45 degs rotation, face up - and hold that same line. Practicing all of the flight positions (360 degs of them) will build a whole new neural library of balance from the core.

The high side arm start is pretty amazing isn't it? The high side arm start carries the velocity of the flight off the wall to the surface and the first stroke from the hip you easily see (and feel) a surge forward. Starting with the low side arm (pull) you felt the deceleration, like stepping of the brakes. From the deck I see it in the wake as the body exits: high side arm start, narrow V-shaped wake; low side arm start (pull) - wide, bowl shaped wake where velocity is lost, vessel decelerates. It's important to do both so the swimmer feels the deceleration from the low side pull verses the surge in speed from the high side arm start from hip - no deceleration. And it's FUN! :-)

@ Ti97. Those are great pieces from Emmit. He underscores the importance, as well as art and science of the approach, turn, jump, flight and exit whether or not you are racing. And he's right - too often we ignore this 1/3 of our swim in a pool which can set us up for great strokes or not so great strokes for the remaining length.

Stuart
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