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Old 03-29-2018
CoachBobM CoachBobM is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 647
CoachBobM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamesgs View Post
CoachBobM -- after 50 yards I am exhausted because I am trying to bring together all the latest, isolated pieces of advise into a single continuous, fluid motion (and am clearly expending energy in many of the wrong places). My approach is to keep it simple by focusing on right side every stroke until I find the basic stroke, and will later focus on bilateral breathing at a later time.

- James

I have since stopped Fast Forward and am taking TI lessons from a single coach to maintain a consistent conversation.
I don't want to give you too much advice if you're currently taking lessons from a TI coach, since the coach can see what you're doing in the water and I can't. But I will pass this along:

21 years ago (about 2 years before I became acquainted with TI), I went to a 1-hour stroke clinic on flip turns. At the time, I already knew how to do freestyle flip turns, and was going in the hope of learning how to do backstroke flip turns (at the time, I could only swim a single continuous pool length of backstroke because I had no idea how to do turns). So I was initially disappointed when the instructor said that they were only going to cover freestyle flip turns. But I was glad, in the end, that I had gone because I identified 7 things that I had been doing wrong in my freestyle flip turns.

The next time I went to the pool, I tried to think about these 7 things every time I did a turn (I was working on 800m freestyle at the time, so I was doing a lot of turns). But I ended up pretty much wasting the entire practice time, because I found that I couldn't think about 7 things at once. So at my next practice, I focused on only 2 of the 7 things, and postponed working on the other 5 until after I perfected those first 2.

From your description, it sounds like you may be having the same problem I did: trying to focus on too many things at once and getting overloaded. Instead, try, on every lap you swim, to have just one thing you're focusing on doing well. You may find that it is best to focus on just that one thing at every practice, and to move on to another focal point when the first one starts to feel comfortable. Or you may find that it works better to vary what the focal point is from lap to lap in each practice.

Let us know how you make out!


Bob
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