Thread: Swim Computers
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Old 11-23-2014
machelett machelett is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sclim View Post
PS I just bought a Wahoo Kick'r Bike trainer.
Nice! I've read about it any it is indeed appealing, compared to the TACX Flow that I have owned for a number of years now.
I will probably not upgrade because I won't be riding my bike indoor much this winter. I'll focus on running and swimming and when I actually feel the need for a ride on my road bike or the triathlon bike, I'll simply deal with the weather or wait for a clear day. I feel that I should take as many opportunities to get out as I can. Besides, on the trainer I tend to sweat like a pig. It isn't half as bad when I'm outside.

I'm fortunate enough to live in a area where it's perfectly practical to use the bike as a means of transportation and so I do that whenever possible, for example to get to the pool or ride into town.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sclim View Post
If you're a serious runner, you might consider getting the Sportiiii made by 4iiiis. I think that maintaining a high cadence in running is as important as efficient stroke/low cadence is in swimming. However training for higher cadence can be problematic. Using the Tempo Trainer in running doesn't work for me because there are footing and terrain and slope considerations that make micromanagement necessary and would throw off the micro timing. Having the cadence relayed back to you in real time is the most effective way for me. However in the initial stages, having to look at your wrist computer frequently can be distracting, and possibly hazardous. The Sportiiii is a sunglasses-mounted array of 7 LEDs, each previously calibrated to a segment of a range of HR, pace and cadence, which can be switched on the fly to display which parameter you want. I prefer to set up the LEDs each to correspond to a range segment of ONE integer wide number of strides per minute, and it can keep me in a very narrow range of variance in training or even a race. I have never heard of anyone else doing it this way, but it worked so well for me, I thought I'd mention it.
At the moment, I run about 30 miles every week but I don't consider myself a serious runner. I lack speed and talent and my joints don't handle high volume and high intensity well. I won't even start to mention the missing cruciate ligament in my left knee and other similar problems. ;)

I wear glasses much of the time but when I head out for a run, I put in contact lenses and enjoy not having anything sitting on my nose. Therefore, the Sportiiii wouldn't be for me.
Apart from that, after having monitored it for a few years, I can quite well sense the current cadence when running. My estimate usually isn't more than two steps per minute off, which is good enough. If I wanted to kick it up a notch beyond my capability to assess the cadence and make sure I hit it consistently, I could use the metronome function (audio or vibration) of the Forerunner 920XT.

That much said, your way of using the LED array is quite clever! Two thumbs up! :)

Last edited by machelett : 11-24-2014 at 11:27 AM. Reason: Typo
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