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Old 12-02-2015
sclim sclim is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zenturtle View Post
yeah I would like to see a 2BK at normal frequency without arms.
Charles has its NAD 2BK m but its has some sculling and I havent seen a swimmer moving fast.

The dolphin kick produces low and high pressure zones just like any other creatures undulating movement.

I also like watching these paralympic swimmers

Here is Zheng again. Very stable bodyline.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YE3P6taIhvk

Another swimmer with the same disability and the same stroke.
Whats interesting to see, is that his battery is empty after 85 m, and that his kick is connected to that fast armstroke.
His kick slows down at the end together with his arm stroke.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2Y3I85_P5s
Zheng, the guy with no arms at all did a fast dolphin kick all through the 50m Free, which is amazing enough. In the 100m Back Stroke

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_oXIdPoSLlE

he does the dolphin kick but intersperses with short segments of flutter kick.

I don't know where to start in all my wonderment, but in the mystery of what is the core movement that provides the stable resistance against rotation, one can hypothesise that when intact-bodied swimmers like Charles do the no-arms swim flutter kick they are doing some hidden or subtle sculling movements. But Zheng has no alibi to fall back on, so what stops his torso from spinning uselessly when he flutter kicks?.

I'm probably dreaming in technicolor, but I have the fantasy that if I can crack the code I can lift some secret from his swimming and insert it like magic into my whole stroke.

It's probably as realistic as the notion that if I developed a hard skull like him it would also somehow be a benefit. I probably shouldn't joke about that -- it actually looks very dangerous with repeated significant impact trauma from driving at the finish wall with his head. I hope they've got that angle covered, and that he has some resilient impact dissipating pad in his cap, and/or there is a specific part of his training that makes the movement of the "touch" with his head somehow very light.
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