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Old 09-01-2016
Zenturtle Zenturtle is offline
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Zenturtle
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If there is one person who associates propulsion with pulling technique its Sheila Taormina.
She hates slippage during the underwater action and strongly advocates to avoid it as much as possible.
So, how is she doing herself in this regard?

start45


start60


mid


end


head forward movement compared to hand rearward movement= slip.
12 grey and 12 red floaters.
from this clip
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F1OOeKleGYs
..................head............hand............ ...head forward.......handslip...................slipfacto r
start45.......11 red.............3grey
start60.......2,5 grey...........2,5grey...........3,5.............0 ,5......... from start45 to start60.... 0,14
mid.............4,5 grey...........1grey..............2..............1 ,5......... from start60 to mid.............0,75
end............. 8 grey.............1o,5 red..........3,5............2,5......... from mid to end..................0,71


Avarage over complete pull
head forward 9 floaters, handslip 4,5 floaters. slipfactor = 4,5/9= 0,5. handslippage is half the forward head movement.
She slips very little at the front of the stroke, so the initiation to hard pulling is gentle and still has some forward spearing movement with little hand pressure, otherwise the slippage would me more at this stage.

This is very good. The guy racing against Sun Yang had a slipfactor somewhere around 0,8.
Conclusion: she is practicing what she preaches. A very good anchor with very little slippage of water.
The average swimmer is closer to a slipfactor of 2. The hand slips twice the amount the head moves forward during the pull.
So she slips 4 times less than the average swimmer. Exceptional.
The arm pulling obsessed swimmer actually moves the body from her anchor better than the vast majority of swimmers.
You could call that a propulsion paradox.

Last edited by Zenturtle : 09-01-2016 at 08:20 PM.
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