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Old 04-14-2012
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Default Breathing is FUNN!

Quote:
Originally Posted by efdoucette View Post
Well, 1.5 years into self taught TI and in the pool 3 to 4 times per week over the last 5 months and my breathing still sucks. It limits me to 50 meters, have done 75 and the odd 100 but rarely.

I've focused on exhale gently, forcefully, and in between. I've tried breathing every 2 strokes, 3 strokes and 4 strokes. I've tried to temper by inhale gasping problem but to little success. I work on nodding with some success, I think.

I am concerned that I will soon lose motivation as I can't get a handle on breathing. Had a very discouraging swim today.

Does anyone have "the magic bullet"?

Eric
Hey Eric,

I didn't read all the responses but most seem to be spot on. First don't give up as most have noted, keep trying. I suspect (and have seen this a lot), and may have already been mentioned, is head postion on non breathing stroke. If you're looking even slightly forward, when you rotate for breath, head and spine will continue to be out of alignment. That is, your forehead will be higher than your chin when breaching surface due to neck being engaged, neck is bent at 20-30degs. This makes it even tougher to get the breath and often lead hand will trigger too soon pushing down to lift head higher - causing everything to fall apart and body to sink. Disengage the neck (neutral head), get breath early at end of body roll (timing is everything), try to keep forehead lower than your chin(at least feel it's lower). This position, as a consequence, head and spine will be in alignment on breathing stroke. No more bending neck to raise top of head to get breath - that's hard; mouth's not on your forehead :-). I see lots of bent necks when breathing in the pool, and huge bow waves. Don't need a bow wave to get your breath, just an alignend head/spine to easily get your o2. Forehead low, chin high - get all the air you need. Happy Swimming! Stuart
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