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-   -   The effects of endurance exercise training on cognitive function in older adults (http://www.totalimmersion.net/forum/showthread.php?t=1127)

CoachBobM 01-22-2010 09:27 PM

The effects of endurance exercise training on cognitive function in older adults
 
An article titled "Chronic endurance exercise training prevents aging-related cognitive decline in healthy older adults: a randomized controlled trial" appeared in the December 23, 2009 issue of the International Journal of Geriatriatric Psychiatry and reported the results of a one-year study in which a group of 60 subjects aged 65-74 years were placed in a supervised Endurance Exercise Training program for one year. Cognitive function was assessed at the beginning and end of the study, both in the 60 patients who were treated and in a control group of 60 patients who did not receive the same treatment. Subjects in the treatment group were 2.74 times as likely to have maintained stable cognitive status at the end of the year than were subjects in the control group.

Grant 01-23-2010 12:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CoachBobM (Post 8633)
An article titled " Subjects in the treatment group were 2.74 times as likely to have maintained stable cognitive status at the end of the year than were subjects in the control group.

Thanks for posting this, Bob. It corresponds with my own experience. I have done endurance practices either by running or swimming for 35 yrs and now at 74 it is only in the last year that I have felt a slippage. I would encourage everyone to maintain their practices as long as it is possible. Even tho I experience some reduction in the above I hate to think what it would of been like if I had not been doing the regimen.

BradMM 03-03-2010 02:11 AM

Too bad it doesn't help REGAIN some of that!

Slipping at 55... :(

Grant 03-03-2010 02:58 AM

A friend at the last Masters meet I was at contributed what I thought was an inciteful comment, which follows.
The person that slows down the slowest is the likely winner.

BradMM 03-03-2010 12:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Grant (Post 9393)
A friend at the last Masters meet I was at contributed what I thought was an inciteful comment, which follows.
The person that slows down the slowest is the likely winner.

What does that mean to you?

Grant 03-03-2010 02:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BradMM (Post 9401)
What does that mean to you?

The context of our conversation was the erosion of our racing times as we aged especially upon reaching the 60's or the 70's. We all had had that experience. So his comment was speaking to that trend. The one who could slow down the slide the most would have the best chance to win a race. So what that means to me is to be constantly looking for improved technique and appropriate intensity of practice. As well as good nutrition and loosening/stretching habits (yoga and such) and core strengthening work.

BradMM 03-03-2010 06:58 PM

Slowing down the aging slide is high on my list, too! I'd love to have a whole forum just to stay in touch with people on that very topic. I'm 55 now but the reason that I do what I do (swim, lift, read a lot) is for that very purpose. Most of the fitness forums that I've visited are dominated by the 20-somethings.

Thanks!

Brad

shuumai 03-03-2010 10:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BradMM (Post 9412)
Slowing down the aging slide is high on my list, too! I'd love to have a whole forum just to stay in touch with people on that very topic. I'm 55 now but the reason that I do what I do (swim, lift, read a lot) is for that very purpose. Most of the fitness forums that I've visited are dominated by the 20-somethings.

Do you want to create a fitness forum? It really isn't that hard to create a forum like we have here. Inexpensive Web hosting, a domain name, and free software is all it takes.

This reminds of a line from "The Peaceful Warrior" movie. "Those who are the hardest to love need it the most." When it comes to fitness, those who are older, weaker, and less fit need exercise the most, yet they are less likely to be active compared to younger, more fit people. Or at least younger people talk about fitness more on the Web.

You can do your best to be as fit as you can, but to not accept natural aging would be counter productive to having a relaxed state of mind. Aging involves change and eventually death. Sorry. heh (I'm actually trying to express something helpful, but it isn't quite working out.) And stressing over it could make it happen sooner.

BradMM 03-04-2010 12:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shuumai (Post 9415)
Do you want to create a fitness forum? It really isn't that hard to create a forum like we have here. Inexpensive Web hosting, a domain name, and free software is all it takes.

Yes, I've created a few forums but I don't sometimes have the patience to wait until they are "populated." On the other hand, there's a couple that have been around for 15 +/- years.

Quote:

Originally Posted by shuumai (Post 9415)
This reminds of a line from "The Peaceful Warrior" movie. "Those who are the hardest to love need it the most." When it comes to fitness, those who are older, weaker, and less fit need exercise the most, yet they are less likely to be active compared to younger, more fit people. Or at least younger people talk about fitness more on the Web.

Or more succinctly, youth is wasted on the young. ;)

Quote:

Originally Posted by shuumai (Post 9415)
You can do your best to be as fit as you can, but to not accept natural aging would be counter productive to having a relaxed state of mind. Aging involves change and eventually death. Sorry. heh (I'm actually trying to express something helpful, but it isn't quite working out.) And stressing over it could make it happen sooner.

As my children have told me, DENIAL is not just a river in Egypt!

Enjoyed your feedback, thanks!

shuumai 03-04-2010 12:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BradMM (Post 9418)
Or more succinctly, youth is wasted on the young. ;)

As my children have told me, DENIAL is not just a river in Egypt!

Yes, you've summed it up quite nicely.

I'd say that youth is wasted on teen-agers. Younger kids and older people seems to have better insight when it comes to living. Blame the hormones. heh

A question you might ask your children: Do you think you will automatically be as fit as I am when you reach my current age?

To quote the Dalai Lama, "...instead of avoiding these sufferings, we deliberately visualise them--the sufferings of birth, the sufferings of aging, the sufferings of fluctuations of status, the sufferings of uncertainty within this lifetime, and the sufferings of death. We deliberately try to think of them so that when we do face them, we are prepared."

Meanwhile, it can't hurt to get up and exercise a bit!

CoachBobM 03-17-2010 09:53 PM

I'm convinced that at least half of what we call "the aging process" isn't really aging.

I used to coach a kids' chess team, and every spring we would go to a college near Boston where the kids would play in a tournament against kids from other areas. We went there on a Wednesday and came back the following Saturday, and during the intervening time, my personal habits were significantly different than they are when I'm at home. There was no pool at the college, so I couldn't swim. And the only food available was what they served at the college cafeteria and snack bar, which was definitely nowhere near as healthy as what I ate at home. When we returned, I'd invariably find that I'd put on a few pounds and lost a little ground with my swimming.

Now, imagine if I made these changes to my lifestyle, not for several days, but for several decades. I'd certainly deteriorate physically, and since I was older I could attribute that deterioration to aging. But it wouldn't be true!

There is a genuine aging process, but I'm convinced that much of what we call aging is really preventable, if we take the proper actions.


Bob

BradMM 03-17-2010 11:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CoachBobM (Post 9660)
There is a genuine aging process, but I'm convinced that much of what we call aging is really preventable, if we take the proper actions.

I most whole heartedly agree but I'm struggling to find my TRUE potential in amongst the various changes my body goes through. In the end, I just keep trying ... just not as hard as before and I feel I'm losing ground because I'm losing confidence. Still, I'm not giving in!

splashingpat 03-18-2010 03:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BradMM;9661
I most wholeheartedly agree
but I'm struggling to find my TRUE potential in amongst the various changes my body goes through. In the end, I just keep trying ...
just not as hard as before and I feel I'm losing ground
because I'm losing confidence. Still, I'm not giving in!

do n't lose the confidence! you are not alone...
why else would I be brave enuf to belly dance at 54ish
when I would n't dream of it at 24ish!
we are out there!

so what's next?
ya never know!

shuumai 03-18-2010 02:35 PM

I can jump rope better now. Why? Slight changes in technique and more relaxation. I'm slightly older than when I started, I've been overeating, and I haven't been exercising as much--at all. Now I can imagine getting more out of jumping. Apparently I didn't need to become younger, stronger, or to try harder. I just needed to be more mindful of the actual experience and find the groove. But as a result, I'm sure my heart and legs will become stronger, my coordination and timing will improve, and I'll feel better overall. It might also help my thinkerer. It also highlights how indirect the process can be for people.

We're not just machines that rely totally on raw computing power and a supply of synthetic oil for our precision parts. We're dynamic, imperfect, and a bit mysterious. That's kind of cool. heh

BradMM 03-18-2010 03:31 PM

I couldn't do chins/pullups as a kid but, at about age 50, I started doing them and I do them all the time now. Maybe we can even get BETTER at some things! :D

shuumai 03-18-2010 03:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BradMM (Post 9677)
I couldn't do chins/pullups as a kid but, at about age 50, I started doing them and I do them all the time now. Maybe we can even get BETTER at some things! :D


OK, your attitude and motivation have been repaired. Get going! hahaha


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