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-   -   Streamlining question (http://www.totalimmersion.net/forum/showthread.php?t=3451)

Grant 05-24-2012 12:04 AM

Streamlining question
 
On GoSwim I saw a demonstration of how he suggests coming off the wall on a turn. The demonstrator had his head well below his arms which were held together as tight as possible. To me this seems to be not as streamlined as having your arms held as tight as possible against your ears. Not as he was doing with his head below his arms.
Fortunately I am flexible enough that I can achieve this position but question it's advisability.
Would like to hear what the forum particants have to say about this.

Richardsk 05-24-2012 08:26 AM

I suppose the only way to find out how it works for you is to try it both ways, perhaps with somebody timing you - or possibly timing yourself if that can be managed. I think it's unlikely to make a huge difference but of course at a high level hundredths of a second count.

Whereas long ago, when we were young, everybody knew that it was the tobacco that counted. ;-)

CoachSuzanne 05-24-2012 05:25 PM

This has been studied with computational fluid dynamics. Head neutral with biceps alongside head is more streamlined.

Grant 05-25-2012 03:45 AM

Thanks for the replies Suzanne and Richard. I thought that it must of been analyzed by experts.

CoachBobM 11-03-2012 01:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Grant (Post 28307)
On GoSwim I saw a demonstration of how he suggests coming off the wall on a turn. The demonstrator had his head well below his arms which were held together as tight as possible. To me this seems to be not as streamlined as having your arms held as tight as possible against your ears. Not as he was doing with his head below his arms.
Fortunately I am flexible enough that I can achieve this position but question it's advisability.
Would like to hear what the forum particants have to say about this.

You certainly don't want your head below your arms, but you probably don't want your arms pressed against your earholes, etiher, since this will spread your elbows too much. I find that it works best to streamline with my arms sort of against the back of my ears (and I can streamline for more than half the length of a short course pool).


Bob

Grant 11-03-2012 05:01 AM

Thanks for the reply Bob. I will check tomorrow where I have been placing my arms. I don't think I have been that precise.

Grant 11-03-2012 11:01 PM

Today I tried the arms just touching the back of the ears and the movement thru the water did feel smoother, less turbulent. Now to burn it in. Thanks again.

CoachBobM 11-07-2012 11:14 PM

You're welcome!


Bob

CoachMatHudson 12-20-2012 07:43 AM

an idea for improving push-off
 
Experimenting with head position is a great exercise, as it will build the feel for which position is truly the most hydrodynamic - as noted above.

In pool training I have a regular habit of marking the 6m mark (just past the flags), either by noting some marking on the pool floor itself, or placing a large smooth glass bead on the floor as break-out marker. This is my target for the push-off and break-out point.

My pattern, if using a Tempo Trainer, is to allow 3 beeps. 0 beep is the push off the wall, 1 beep is straight streamline, 2 beep is a slight body dolphin, and 3 beep is when I should start the first underwater catch.

If not using a Tempo Trainer, I will still do an internal count to three. But I always aim for that marker on the pool floor.

As intensity increases I will be more challenged at holding a long streamlined body to reach my marker. In a long set I notice most swimmers start the first one or two breakouts at a nice distance, but then shorten up the breakout significantly for subsequent lengths. Examining the reasons why is important for each swimmer to see where we are losing focus on streamline or quality of the push-off or break-out.

At any intensity level using a marker like this can also be good for drawing your attention to anything that causes you to breakout shorter than your goal. The power of the push (how steady or how snappy), the depth at which I pushed off, how straight and parallel to the surface I was, etc.

And when I see that I've come up half-a-stroke short on the marker, I know this will mean I've already lost half-a-stroke on my SPL. So it helps me stay keen on every detail that makes a perfect 25 length.

The most annoying problem of using markers like this to help imprint push-off skill is that people (or kids) unfamiliar with my routine see my markers and pick them up, wondering what they are, or think it is a free toy to start playing with. So find something that looks boring to draw little attention but my own, yet heavy enough and big enough to not slip down the pool drain.

CoachMatHudson 12-20-2012 08:02 AM

Proving superior head position
 
When I do childrens lessons I keep a 20m section of rope in my swim gadget basket. I tie a small loop in one end. Then I give that loop to a swimmer, have them get out in the pool to the end of the rope. I stand on deck ready to reel the rope in. They will lay flat on the water surface with arms extended in front in long streamline position (I call it "Be LONG like a pencil!").

Then I instruct her to lift her head to look a little forward as I reel her in at a steady pace. Then we do it again, while their head is down, ears tucked between the shoulders as I say, and I have her tell me the difference she felt. Then I switch places and have her reel me in while I place my head in different positions so she can feel the change in force she has to apply to keep me coming at a steady pace as my head position changes.

It becomes instant sensory proof to every single student what the superior hydrodynamic head position is. Any angle adjustment in the head is immediately registered in a force change by the arms/hands of the one reeling in, and in the feel of water pressured against the head of the swimmer.

It is an easy way or a coach or swimmer to validate what physiologists, therapists and those studied in hydrodynamics will tell us. Keep that head looking down and entire spine in line.

I stand my students in a line, walk to each one and touch the crown of the head - that point where the spine would poke out of the skull as if on a shishkabob stick - and tell me swimmers that this is the head of their torpedo. Where that points is where their energy will go. So let's keep it pointed straight down the lane.

By concentrating on pointing that 'laser lead' shishkabob line toward the far wall, it can really helps the head find the best position between the arms during the push-off.


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