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-   -   Strength Training for Swimming (http://www.totalimmersion.net/forum/showthread.php?t=3047)

dshen 01-02-2012 02:35 PM

Strength Training for Swimming
 
Lately, I have been big on building strength. I have been using some techniques popularized in 4 Hour Body, which led me to Barry Ross's Underground Secrets to Faster Running. This then led me to Dragondoor.com and Pavel's many different strength building methods from Russia (here is a selection from amazon).

I have been deadlifting and bench pressing, and also added in some kettlebells and indian club swinging into the mix. With regards to swimming, I am finding that my shoulders don't get sore any more - first was because I was swimming with TI, but secondly, I think that my whole upper body muscle structure is more balanced and stronger.

I was wondering if anyone else has been using strength building techniques for swimming and any comments about how it has worked or not worked. Does anyone have any links to strength programs used for swimmers?

Thanks!

CoachSuzanne 01-02-2012 02:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dshen (Post 25073)
Lately, I have been big on building strength. I have been using some techniques popularized in 4 Hour Body, which led me to Barry Ross's Underground Secrets to Faster Running. This then led me to Dragondoor.com and Pavel's many different strength building methods from Russia (here is a selection from amazon).

I have been deadlifting and bench pressing, and also added in some kettlebells and indian club swinging into the mix. With regards to swimming, I am finding that my shoulders don't get sore any more - first was because I was swimming with TI, but secondly, I think that my whole upper body muscle structure is more balanced and stronger.

I was wondering if anyone else has been using strength building techniques for swimming and any comments about how it has worked or not worked. Does anyone have any links to strength programs used for swimmers?

Thanks!

I think what you are doing is fine. I work with a personal trainer with my cycling team adn we do 1 hour once per week of planks & TRX work along with some basic lifts & machine work (pullups & dips). I have the same feeling that my shoulders do not get as tired and I'm less fatigued int he water.

I think ongoing strength work is important beause freestyle swimming is an unbalanced activity, but the gains you see will reach diminishing returns at which point more (quality) swimming will be the key factor.

Likewise for very new people, pretty much anything will help. Strength work may even mask poor technique because people can suffer t hrough sloppy strokes a little longer, note the improvement and feel like they should continue to do more strength work to improve.

andyinnorway 01-02-2012 05:41 PM

I would be interested in some swimming (TI particularly) strength training, then I can use the communal gym at the pool on Mondays and Tuesdays as today was another round of 10 in the lane 35deg zero etiquette shambles.

Plus side was H2O audio housing is awesome. Think I'll try some debussy next time and see if I can leave the pool spiritually whilst still maintaining a physical prescense.

bx 01-02-2012 06:10 PM

Joined gym at same time as restarting swimming a year ago. Enjoy both equally. Thanks to TI, I also find a great deal of enjoyment in practising proper technique with weights. Plus, me got some pecs now :)

Happy New Year,
via Sunny Bournemouth

swim2Bfree 01-02-2012 06:27 PM

I'm not a strength coach, but my personal sense is that unless you're training to be seriously competitive in power-heavy events (100m or less), it's better to pursue a broad program of strength training - many muscles in a balanced fashion - rather than something "swim-specific" or "TI-specific." I don't know what "TI-specific" would even mean.

Free weight routines and calisthenics are great because they work stabilizer muscles and better simulate natural movements (compared to Nautilus-type machines). However, they depend on proper technique and can lead to injury if not performed correctly.

ian mac 01-02-2012 06:38 PM

A great resource for strength training for swimmers
 
One of the many important lessons that Terry continues to reinforce in me is that swimming is an integrated all body movement, not a pull/kick movement. When one accepts this, you realize that the stroke initiates from the HIP, not the arm, and the key to streamlining and swimming longer on your side comes from greater hip rotation. Consequently, much emphasis on more efficient swimming comes from strengthening the core muscles at least as much as any other part of the body.
The book "Complete Conditioning For Swimming" by Dave Salo and Scott Riewald, head swim coach of USC & former head of bio-mechanics for USA Swimming respectively, is an exceptional reference and even has a DVD demonstrating many of the exercises. While working extensively on core exercises, it has many great dry land swimming oriented workouts from beginner to advanced.
Ian

swim2Bfree 01-02-2012 06:44 PM

I will second ian mac's recommendation of Dave Salo's book. It's a goldmine of useful advice. Core strength is important in swimming, as it is in everyday life.

Richardsk 01-02-2012 06:55 PM

I'm a fan of yoga and think that the usual poses recommended for beginners are very beneficial.

There's a chap in Florida called Dr Al Sears who promotes a system he calls PACE, which is, basically, intense interval bodyweight training. It is not expensive and I think it's worth what he's asking, but you have to actually do the exercises. I find it hard to fit them in as well as the yoga and swimming and the odd bit of walking. I resolve to try harder in the New Year.

He also sells a wide variety of magic potions from remote hill tribes from high in the Andes or Bali or other exotic locations. My snake oil detectors are too highly developed to try any of these, although for all I know I may be missing out.

He does seem to be very well informed about nutrition and exercise, weight loss and other health concerns, and whatever you can think of, he has a remedy he will ship to you.

arunks 01-03-2012 12:30 PM

Came across an article you may be interested.Titled "Duration specific training".
Part1.Part2.Part3.

Arun

terry 01-03-2012 03:13 PM

Ian and Bx are correct in saying we encourage people to do strength and resistance training -- but to avoid attempting to make it 'swim-specific.'

In fact, if there is such a thing as "TI-specific" strength training it's to prioritize muscle groups in this order
1) Spinal stabilizers - the muscles that keep the body aligned -- especially when there are different, and often conflicting, forces being applied to each side of the body. These muscles (1) keep the entire bodyline toned and aligned during the stroke; (2) keep the right side aligned while left side is stroking and recovering; and (3) connect propelling actions to the power-producing weight shift.
2) Secondary movers - the small muscles - mainly in the shoulder - that hold the arm in a high-traction position (we call it the Soft Hook position) during the weight shift. These muscles are small and weak and hard to 'educate.'
3) Prime movers - the large, highly visible muscles that young men admire in the mirror between weight-heaving sets. These are waaay more than strong enough to apply the amount of power/pressure the water can handle in any event above the 50m. They're also strong enough to overwhelm the secondary movers if we apply them full-force. The instinctive tendency to overuse them is very strong and--in nearly all cases--must be UNlearned.

Many swim-specific strength programs have these priorities exactly reversed.


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