Total Immersion Forums

Total Immersion Forums (http://www.totalimmersion.net/forum/index.php)
-   Links and References (http://www.totalimmersion.net/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=2)
-   -   Strength Training for Swimming (http://www.totalimmersion.net/forum/showthread.php?t=3047)

terry 01-03-2012 03:20 PM

If I was forced to choose only one activity with which to complement my swimming, it would unquestionably be yoga. Partly because I enjoy it more than any other. Partly because I feel its combination of mindfulness/awareness and the way it encourages supple strength is ideal for the kind of strength that applies in the water.

Since I'm not currently forced to choose, I also do strength training -- nearly all of it involving instability. E.G. Rather than bench press with a barbell, I do alternate-arm presses with dumbbells (50 lbs each) with my shoulder blades resting on a balance ball. I s-l-o-w-l-y raise right arm while s-l-o-w-l-y lowering left, and vice versa.
I complete this routine in 20 min and do it 2-3x/week immediately after yoga class.

My primary reason for the strength/weight training is its value in countering the effects of aging. And so when the snow starts to fly, I'll be able to shovel for an hour with no ill affects.

grandall 01-03-2012 04:25 PM

Dshen,

For swimming strength (TI of course) because it's core a driven technique and not shoulder driven I do alot of core exercises using a ball. I also do yoga (spine alignment/flexibility) and Tia Chi (for more relaxation and breathing). I also do lat pull downs with light weights not for bulk but for strength.

As a triathlete I do some light wieght training more to benifit my run/bike part

I think above all I swim alot that is a huge benifit in itself.

andyinnorway 01-03-2012 06:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by terry (Post 25127)
If I was forced to choose only one activity with which to complement my swimming, it would unquestionably be yoga. Partly because I enjoy it more than any other. Partly because I feel its combination of mindfulness/awareness and the way it encourages supple strength is ideal for the kind of strength that applies in the water.

Since I'm not currently forced to choose, I also do strength training -- nearly all of it involving instability. E.G. Rather than bench press with a barbell, I do alternate-arm presses with dumbbells (50 lbs each) with my shoulder blades resting on a balance ball. I s-l-o-w-l-y raise right arm while s-l-o-w-l-y lowering left, and vice versa.
I complete this routine in 20 min and do it 2-3x/week immediately after yoga class.

My primary reason for the strength/weight training is its value in countering the effects of aging. And so when the snow starts to fly, I'll be able to shovel for an hour with no ill affects.

Terry, be great if you could do a blog on your Yoga exercises or even a youtube post. Thanks. Failing that please point us in a direction for good source material.

CoachSuzanne 01-03-2012 06:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by terry (Post 25126)
. They're also strong enough to overwhelm the secondary movers if we apply them full-force. The instinctive tendency to overuse them is very strong and--in nearly all cases--must be UNlearned.

Many swim-specific strength programs have these priorities exactly reversed.

So true, so true. What's a real shame in my mind is when athletic, lean women follow these ideas as well and I see them ripping through the water and ruining their traction & streamline...because they are focused on using the prime movers. Turn those off, activate the core & the rotator cuff and you have a totally different swimmer.

dshen 01-03-2012 08:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by terry (Post 25126)
Ian and Bx are correct in saying we encourage people to do strength and resistance training -- but to avoid attempting to make it 'swim-specific.'

In fact, if there is such a thing as "TI-specific" strength training it's to prioritize muscle groups in this order
1) Spinal stabilizers - the muscles that keep the body aligned -- especially when there are different, and often conflicting, forces being applied to each side of the body. These muscles (1) keep the entire bodyline toned and aligned during the stroke; (2) keep the right side aligned while left side is stroking and recovering; and (3) connect propelling actions to the power-producing weight shift.
2) Secondary movers - the small muscles - mainly in the shoulder - that hold the arm in a high-traction position (we call it the Soft Hook position) during the weight shift. These muscles are small and weak and hard to 'educate.'
3) Prime movers - the large, highly visible muscles that young men admire in the mirror between weight-heaving sets. These are waaay more than strong enough to apply the amount of power/pressure the water can handle in any event above the 50m. They're also strong enough to overwhelm the secondary movers if we apply them full-force. The instinctive tendency to overuse them is very strong and--in nearly all cases--must be UNlearned.

Many swim-specific strength programs have these priorities exactly reversed.

Strengthening the muscles involved in the actual movement is very important. One thing I learned from reading all those materials is that we also need to strengthen other muscles, potentially the muscles that aren't directly involved in the movements. Inbalances in these muscle pairs (agonists and antagonists) can create a lot of problems also, leading to instability and injury.

By strengthen, there are again, 3 components - strength, endurance, and neuromuscular. the most interesting of the 3 is actually neuromuscular. by training with heavier weights, but not necessarily with more reps, one starts activating the neuromuscular system to its fullest. in fact, it is the correct chains of muscles across the entire body that must act in perfect concert to achieve flawless motion. if we have any muscles in the chain that are misfiring or not firing, then problems will inevitably occur.

Our sedentary lives can lead to a wasting away of not only muscles, but the nervous system's ability to fire the chain correctly. by sitting in front of our computers and our TVs, we have literally forgotten how to move!

like Terry mentioned, Prime movers are the territory of body builders, but that is not the best way to build strength. we might feel good looking like Arnold, but functionally we need to look more towards involving the whole body with strength programs rather than just isolating our biceps for big guns.

igorner 01-03-2012 09:40 PM

Just turned 60 and weight training
 
Having just turned 60 , personally , I think it important to include weight training in my regular routine. We tend to loose bone and muscle faster at certain ages...so after my swim ..its off to the the gym for me.

BTW ,having really just starting the TI method I am pleased to report much better swims.....more comfotable..and if my timex is correct much faster laps. Each individual lap is no longer the struggle it used to be.

I do get some perplexed looks form the other swimmers though...apparently I'm not playing by the rules. I'm getting much advice about using fins and flutter boards.

I don't listen.
Ian

arunks 01-04-2012 12:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by andyinnorway (Post 25136)
Terry, be great if you could do a blog on your Yoga exercises or even a youtube post. Thanks. Failing that please point us in a direction for good source material.

Yoga is not just about physical exercises. I feel doing Yoga in itself is a great learning process for the physical, mental and the spiritual. I have found this to compliment Ti like swimming really well which provides strength and the flexibility for swimming.

The traditional way of practicing Yoga is the Ashtanga Yoga(Eight Limbs of Ashtanga). You can know more about it here. There are other style of Yoga with little variations. The sequence of Yoga asanas starts with standing poses and moves on to back bending, forward bends, arm balances, seated twists and inversions. You can practice under a teacher or guru or you could buy a DVD and a go at a slow pace until you find more confidence in doing difficult poses. Currently I am finding the videos of KinoMacgregor very useful.Click here.

There are a few asanas given here.But to practice the difficult ones, you need to master the basic ones and become more flexible.

Other Sources:Yoga Journal

Arun

razo999 07-09-2018 09:47 PM

i have the anwer
 
Meditation is a sharp technique for resting your mind and reaching a certain level of deep awareness and a state of consciousness by experiencing the core of it and heading to the center within ourselves.

But wait – there’s more
https://thoughts4spread.com/a-new-pe...tion-and-yoga/


All times are GMT. The time now is 05:09 PM.

Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.