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andyinnorway
07-28-2013, 05:49 PM
If every race is as good as that men's 4x100m then I'm not going out much this week. The russian in the final leg was staring at the USA swimmer every stroke and the frenchmen just swam past him, he had no idea, great race, brilliant TV.

Richardsk
07-28-2013, 09:33 PM
Hi Andy

Found it on youtube. Don't know if it's viewable everywhere but OK in UK.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rBc0qygWoW8

Not top quality and commentary in Hungarian. Lovely language but I'm afraid I don't understand more than one or two words. A worthwhile project for me old age. ;-)

Richardsk
07-28-2013, 09:57 PM
And here's the women's 400m final, with Katie Ledecky leading them all. It must be very disheartening for her competitors to see her tearing away and not having the good grace to die on the last length.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=epNqu4o8xOs

terry
07-29-2013, 02:20 AM
On the men's 4x100, two US swimmers made the same mistake that cost the US gold in the same event in (2004?) Olympics v. Australia. Overswimming the first leg. Repeatedly the US would pull to a large lead the first 50, then give it back the 2nd 50.
The Russian overswam the first 50 on the final leg and faded badly down the stretch.
Thirty-odd years ago, I taught even 11-12s to be conscious of the 'adrenaline effect' and control opening half of relay legs. It's dismaying to see elites fall prey to it.

US Mens splits
Nathan Adrian 22.31 47.95 (+3.6)
LOCHTE*Ryan 22.47 47.80 (+2.9)
ERVIN*Anthony 21.76 47.44 (+4.0)
FEIGEN*James 22.73 48.23 (+2.9)
Optimal differential between 1st and 2nd 50 in 100m is about 2 sec. Allow .5 sec for relay start and optimal differential on relay would be 2.5, with a small fudge factor to 3.0. Lochte and Feigen are inside that. Adrian and Ervin way over. More control on 1st 50 might have made the difference between silver and gold.

And I'll bet there are swimmers who didn't make the relay because of poor pacing who--with a smarter pace--might have made it better.

terry
07-29-2013, 02:31 AM
And here's the women's 400m final, with Katie Ledecky leading them all.

I like her swimming. Very controlled stroke. I counted a few lengths. She took 40 strokes on her 4th length, then held 39 on 5-6-7, finishing at 40 on the last length. Excellent SL for a woman.

Richardsk
07-29-2013, 09:09 AM
Hi Terry

Interesting observations on the differentials between first and second 50s, and I believe correct. Going too fast on the first 50 is a common mistake, even among elites. They are young and impetuous, as I suppose sprinters ought to be, but learning to rein in the impetuosity should be part of their training. Relays are very exciting at any level but on a great occasion such as Worlds they must b even more so.

As for Ledecky, she is wonderful, but I wonder if she had taken it a bit easier in the opening laps whether she might not have beaten the world record. No doubt she will in due course. She was well ahead of the world record line for the first three 100s. A very clean stroke too, with not much splash and not much wake from the feet.

terry
07-29-2013, 12:05 PM
Here, for comparison and perhaps analysis, is the women's 4x100 relay, with a terrific final leg from Megan Romano after Cate Campbell had seemed to open up an unassailable lead on the first leg.[/url]

Super swims by both Natalie Coughlin and Romano. The number of sub-53 splits in textile is very encouraging.

I wonder if Katie might have closed more strongly, without sacrificing early speed, if she'd swum 39SPL, maybe even 38, in laps 2-3-4 by a focus on swimming with an even quieter, cleaner stroke -- I.e. even less water disturbance. Move water a bit less. Move Katie a bit more.

A differential of +2 SPL over 50m is pretty reasonable in the 400 and gives the swimmer the ability to close very fast. Sun Yang was +4 SPL in the last 50 of his 1500, compared to what he'd done while swimming at more sustainable (yet still very fast) pace earlier in the race. And he's much taller.

The ability to deploy racing/pacing tactics such as this is why I love 'gears' practice. 30+ years ago I had my breaststrokers practice a range as low as 10SPL and as high as 20SPL in a 50m pool and they were super-successful racers at both 100 and 200m and noteworthy for strong finishes, by having the ability to greatly increase tempo and power without sacrificing efficiency in final quarter. At 10SPL in 50m, you have to be very conscious of NOT moving the water around.

It's a learnable skill.

terry
07-29-2013, 12:07 PM
Richard
My apologies. I meant to quote you from the post on which you put up links to 4x100 women and I seem to somehow have edited instead. Or deleted. Or something. Now your post is missing.

But thanks for searching for and posting those links.

Richardsk
07-29-2013, 02:59 PM
No problem

Here it is again:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=itfSdbdxpW8

andyinnorway
07-30-2013, 05:01 PM
Another fantastic battle with Ledecky and Friis in the 1500m.

It made me wonder, Friis looks very even left to right, but Ledecky looks to take a shorter stroke on the left to the right as a lot of the elite guys seem to do this week.

Do the coaches at this level measure this difference and is the information available to us?

Richardsk
07-31-2013, 09:07 AM
Good morning

Great race and our Hungarian friend has uploaded a fairly full video. I notice the commentator pronounces Ledecky in the Czech style as Ledetsky. I suppose Katie's family originally came from that area because that seems to be where most of the Ledeckys originate.

Amazing that Lauren Boyle, who was a long way behind the two leaders, was right on the old world record line until the last length. A gutsy swim with nobody to pull her along and finishing with an Oceania record.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=byMv67RbWgM

Looking forward to the men's 800 final tonight. I wouldn't bet against Sun. ;-)

Richardsk
07-31-2013, 07:59 PM
Men's 800 final (start and last 400m or so) from the Hungarian fan.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KeIcoMvYDKk

Good swim from McBroom, just touching out Cochrane.

terry
07-31-2013, 08:46 PM
Men's 800 final (start and last 400m or so) from the Hungarian fan.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KeIcoMvYDKk

Good swim from McBroom, just touching out Cochrane.

Sun was clearly just toying with (tantalizing?) them until final 3 lengths.

Stuff I can't help noticing--and thinking:

Notice: How McBroom lifts his head every breath--so noticeable as he swims next to Sun. I didn't count his strokes, but let's say 35 breaths per length x 16 lengths. Or 560 times multiplied by What portion of 10 lbs (4.5kg). Let's say it's only 1 lb extra weight borne - 560 unnecessary 1-lb lifts WHILE trying to keep pace with the greatest distance swimmer in history.

Think: How can you be the coach of an athlete with the capability to stand on the podium at the World Championships and leave that particular highly visible 'stone unturned?'

Richardsk
07-31-2013, 09:36 PM
Yes. He certainly has a bouncy stroke and I suppose what you'd call a gallop. His style reminds me of the Russian Yury Prilukov.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1LtBWw6c-Aw

However, although Prilukov has a similar rhythm, I don't think he lifts his head, or not as much. I wonder if he's still active?

andyinnorway
08-01-2013, 06:08 AM
I thought Sun looked almost contemptuous at the start of the race, like an athlete who'd had a big row with his coach or team manager.

The way he fired the turbo and took a 2 second lead between 650-700m was astonishing.

Richardsk
08-02-2013, 07:17 AM
Here's another video of the men's 4 x 100 Free from France this time, and understandably the French commentators get a bit excited ;-)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bTgzQj71NVo&list=TLV5A1AB12Xe8

Here are the splits for France and USA

1 6 FRA***France 3:11.18
AGNEL*Yannick 0.68 23.16 48.76 (7)*48.76
MANAUDOU*Florent 0.36 22.91 47.93 (4)*1:36.69
GILOT*Fabien 0.19 21.99 46.90 (4)*2:23.59
STRAVIUS*Jeremy 0.31 22.66 47.59 (1)*3:11.18

2 4 USA***United*States*of*America 3:11.42 0.24
ADRIAN*Nathan 0.67 22.31 47.95 (1)*47.95
LOCHTE*Ryan 0.18 22.47 47.80 (2)*1:35.75
ERVIN*Anthony 0.25 21.76 47.44 (1)*2:23.19
FEIGEN*James 0.18 22.73 48.23 (2)*3:11.42

Gilot's 3rd leg was obviously crucial or Stravius could never have made up the deficit.

Since Terry has pointed out the importance of keeping the the differential between first and second 50 as small as possible and the risk of going out too fast, I thought that the differentials might also be of interest

AGN 2.44
MAN 2.11
GIL 2.92
STR 2.27

ADR 3.33
LOC 2.86
ERV 3.92
FEI 2.77

In the individual 100 Free Final Vlad Morozov was a spectacular example of the consequence of over swimming the first 50, with a first 50 of 21.94 and a second of 26.07 for a differential of 4.13. It was still a pretty good time of course, and good enough for fifth place, ahead of Gilot, for example. One could say that he swam a brilliant 75 meters.

terry
08-02-2013, 11:34 AM
Since Terry has pointed out the importance of keeping the the differential between first and second 50 as small as possible and the risk of going out too fast, I thought that the differentials might also be of interest

AGN 2.44
MAN 2.11
GIL 2.92
STR 2.27

ADR 3.33
LOC 2.86
ERV 3.92
FEI 2.77


Richard
I'd thought of going back to calculate differential for French swimmers, but lacked the time so thank you for doing so. I think one could make the case that the French won the gold--not by swimming faster than the Yanks, but by swimming a bit slower at the right time.
When I was coaching relatively advanced competitive swimmers (In 1982-83 I coached a swimmer who was ranked Top 10 worldwide in the 50LCM and was pretty decent for that era in 100LCM -- 51+ and coached Joe Novak to a 50-point in 100LCM in the late 90s) I was quite strict about the importance of their learning to maintain a differential in flat-start 100s of 1.5 to 2.0. With a relay start that should convert to 2.0 to 2.5.

In sprints most are decelerating in last 25m. I coached my sprinters to use pacing tactics early to delay that deceleration until 85m or later and reduce the amount of speed loss. In racing it worked exceptionally well because of the great advantage psychologically of feeling strong and catching/passing rivals in final 25m--and conversely the stress of being the prey, not the predator.

According to the formulation, Manaudou and Stravius swam tactically superb legs--which take enormous discipline in such circumstances. That was a well-earned gold.

andyinnorway
08-02-2013, 06:36 PM
Richard
In racing it worked exceptionally well because of the great advantage psychologically of feeling strong and catching/passing rivals in final 25m--and conversely the stress of being the prey, not the predator.

This is why I've decided to be a better runner for Triathlon - overtaking people for 10km must have a synergistic benefit on your energy levels as opposed to being overtaken for 10km as happened to me last time.

Since Gilot swam 46.9 I think we should forgive him his 2.92 split difference?

andyinnorway
08-03-2013, 07:50 AM
4x200m men

yangtastic !!!

terry
08-03-2013, 10:49 AM
4x200m men

yangtastic !!!

Yangtastic indeed.
There were 4 or 5 swimmers who swam faster than Yang on the first 100, but no one in the entire field was within 2 seconds!!! of his final 200 time.

His splits 50.6-52.5 -- Differential of 1.9 sec.

This is how winners swim relays.

It takes mental discipline and an efficient stroke.

One does not achieve this kind of swim by either stroking faster, nor harder.

Richardsk
08-03-2013, 09:04 PM
Women's 800 m FINAL

Ledecky does it again, with another WR

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kRp-xkxZB3c

I notice that the commentators have corrected the pronunciation of Ledecky to the American version. The BBC commentators don't seem able to pronounce many foreign names correctly. They do know a bit about swimming, though.

I noticed in the close up shots on the BBC iPlayer that Ledecky enters thumb first with her right hand but more or less flat with her left. I wonder if this is just a minor detail that isn't really important or perhaps something that might affect her longevity as a swimmer. Current thinking, I believe, is that the thumb first entry is dangerous for the shoulder.

terry
08-04-2013, 11:30 AM
Current thinking, I believe, is that the thumb first entry is dangerous for the shoulder.

Correct. Not good to let even a seemingly slight detail, that most would overlook, go uncorrected in a distance swimmer--probably high mileage trainer. Especially given the stakes, as she's currently #1 in the world 'with a bullet' as they used to say in Top 40 radio days.

Her final 50m split of 29.79 suggests she had a lot left in the tank at the end. I'd think she might be capable of 8:10 or faster if she had a rival capable of pushing her.

andyinnorway
08-04-2013, 07:25 PM
mens 1500m,

was Sun toying with Cochrane or was there evidence of a man whose been putting too much focus on his 200m swim to be as comfortable as he was last year at the longer distance?

Richardsk
08-04-2013, 07:53 PM
My impression was that Sun was looking to win races rather than break records and that he did just what was necessary to win. Cochrane and Paltrinieri swam very well but I don't think there was any doubt that Sun was in control the whole time.

It is quite possible that he is not in quite as good condition as last year, but he certainly had a terrific meet.

He seems to have a lot of pent up anger in him that comes out after he finishes. Not unlike Cielo, really, who seems to go completely ape when he wins.

The women are all hugs and kisses, though, which seems quite genuine. Missy Franklin, in particular, seems the very distillation of sweetness and light, concealing a steely determination.

andyinnorway
08-05-2013, 05:54 AM
My impression was that Sun was looking to win races rather than break records and that he did just what was necessary to win. Cochrane and Paltrinieri swam very well but I don't think there was any doubt that Sun was in control the whole time.

It is quite possible that he is not in quite as good condition as last year, but he certainly had a terrific meet.

He seems to have a lot of pent up anger in him that comes out after he finishes. Not unlike Cielo, really, who seems to go completely ape when he wins.

The women are all hugs and kisses, though, which seems quite genuine. Missy Franklin, in particular, seems the very distillation of sweetness and light, concealing a steely determination.

hasn't Sun had some issues with coaches and chinese federation this year? I think his post race explosions may be hiding more than cielo's

Richardsk
08-05-2013, 08:40 AM
Yes. Sun has had a running battle with the federation. The impression one has is that they feel they own him. He had to hand over a large amount of his prize money because they had paid for his training in Australia and they didn't like his romance with some young lady - an air hostess, I believe, and accused him of slacking.

Morozov also had a bit of a battle with the Russian federation and in fact announced that he would be taking out some other citizenship before Rio. American perhaps?

The strange thing about Cielo is that he seems such an affable and laid back character except when he wins. And of course he always cries when they play the Brazilian anthem, so he is clearly a very emotional character.

I think they could all learn from Missy Franklin, who seems to wear a permanent grin.

What a wonderful week of swimming it has been, and the World Cup is coming soon. (;-)

andyinnorway
08-05-2013, 07:14 PM
Yes. Sun has had a running battle with the federation. The impression one has is that they feel they own him. He had to hand over a large amount of his prize money because they had paid for his training in Australia and they didn't like his romance with some young lady - an air hostess, I believe, and accused him of slacking.

Morozov also had a bit of a battle with the Russian federation and in fact announced that he would be taking out some other citizenship before Rio. American perhaps?

The strange thing about Cielo is that he seems such an affable and laid back character except when he wins. And of course he always cries when they play the Brazilian anthem, so he is clearly a very emotional character.

I think they could all learn from Missy Franklin, who seems to wear a permanent grin.

What a wonderful week of swimming it has been, and the World Cup is coming soon. (;-)

Not just missy but the whole USA team, Lochte always takes the time to congratulate the other teams or swimmers and I like the lack of ego so many of these top swimmers have.

Richardsk
08-06-2013, 07:18 AM
I think the US swimmers must receive coaching in graciousness and diplomacy because they are always full of praise for the others in post race interviews. Either that or it is part of the national culture. As far as most sports go, winning is part of the culture, of course, and swimming is certainly one where a final without one or two US participants is rare.

terry
08-06-2013, 09:21 AM
I think the US swimmers must receive coaching in graciousness and diplomacy

Upon qualifying for the national team, US swimmers do receive media training arranged by USA Swimming. The national organization also does much to cultivate team spirit, among swimmers who come from many different teams. National team swimmers are brought together for many training and culture-building events each year.

And perhaps some of Missy Franklin's perpetually sunny disposition and sense of perspective may be rubbing off on fellow USA swimmers. I've read accounts in which even rivals for Olympic and World Team slots say she breaks tension and puts others at ease in environments like the pre-race ready room. Since she has been on the national team, other elite swimmers would be spending a significant amount of time each year having that positive influence affect the face they show the world. Younger swimmers especially. Lochte has similarities.

I haven't met her but get the sense she is entirely genuine.

I've also read accounts by emigres to the US who say they find a sort of spirit of national optimism and openness refreshing upon arriving here.

Janos
08-07-2013, 09:57 PM
Interesting comments regarding UK under performance in Barca. Apparently our training facility in Sheffield has oxygen and ozone in the water, and the correct depth for perfect buoyancy. Whereas the pools we compete in are 'slower'.
So head coach calls for training in other pools to prepare swimmers for slower water.
Should the water really be an issue? Should an elite athlete be able to adjust their balance to suit various conditions? Also, does anybody have a favourite pool purely for the quality of its water, as in, it seems to allow for faster swimming?

Janos

Richardsk
08-07-2013, 11:34 PM
Hi Janos

In my opinion this story about the Ponds Forge pool being too fast and better than the sort of pool in which ordinary swimmers from the USA, China, Lithuania, and New Zealand and Russia can set World, European, American and Oceanic records is a load of nonsense.

I have never swum at Ponds Forge but I hear it is a great facility and one of the so-called fast pools. I think the pool at Barcelona must be pretty fast too, to judge from the results. Strangely, it seems to be faster for the fast swimmers than for the not so fast swimmers.

If I ever get the chance to swim in either Ponds Forge or the Palau Sant Jordi I'll see if any of the magic rubs off on me. ;-)

terry
08-08-2013, 10:16 AM
I've swum in a fair few of the pools considered state of the art, and must say in every instance it's been an uplifting experience. While I can consistently experience states of something close to ecstasy in a fairly ordinary pool--so long as it's outdoors and 50m--there's no question that swimming in a pool designed to produce records is an enhanced experience.

Not only have I noticed that the water feels like quicksilver, but the filtration and ventilation systems are top shelf, the water temp is ideal for performance--and thus training. And the overall environment--both architectural and amenities--is designed for maximum appeal and comfort.

Given the choice to practice occasionally in such a place, I eagerly seek it. (I'll visit Barca in mid-Oct and will definitely look for an opportunity to swim at Palau Sant Jordi.) But most such pools are indoors and my greater preference is to swim outdoors.

Having said that, the majority of my competitive coaching (the exception being several years at the US Military Academy) was spent in relatively inferior, overcrowded, too-shallow, and . . . well, slow . . . pools.

I unequivocally considered that an advantage. When we produced very fast times in practice--which my swimmers regularly did because I orchestrated practice and set design to produce that outcome--I and they knew it was real. And when we walked on deck, or swim in warmup, at one of the top shelf pools at a regional or national championship, they got enormously excited.

terry
08-08-2013, 10:22 AM
Not only because she's the fastest woman in the world in 400/800/1500 but because her longer, controlled-tempo stroke (I read a lengthy article on her training by Yuri Sugiyama her coach and he emphasized tempo training quite a bit) seems ideally adapted to taking 5000 to 10000 or more uninterrupted strokes.

Ditto Sun Yang of course.

Does anyone else share this feeling?

2016???

Richardsk
08-08-2013, 07:29 PM
I suppose the fastest pool I have swum in is the 50m pool in Manchester, where the British Masters Championships were held in 2008. I believe Grant Hackett set one of his world records there at a Commonwealth Games.

That meet was remarkable for me in that almost all my swims were personal bests and some of them still are, for example the 400m, 800m and 1500m Free, which I will probably never improve on, although I am aiming to do so if at all possible. I don't know how much was due to the pool and how much was due to other factors. The other 50m pools I have swum in, Crawley, Swansea, Cardiff and Aldershot have also produced some best times. In any case I greatly enjoyed swimming in all of them.

As for seeing Katie Ledecky and Sun Yang swimming in open water, that would indeed be interesting, but probably not very likely, although Sun might well take a fancy to doing a 5k or 10k. I wouldn't like to be the swimmer whose shoulder he was sitting on throughout a 10k if indeed there is anyone in the world who could stay with him that long never mind ahead of him.

Chloe Sutton of course converted to pool swimming from open water and no doubt could convert back again.

andyinnorway
08-09-2013, 04:54 AM
I think Sun is unlikely to compete out of the pool as I think he is personally interested in being a blue riband swimmer, and is more likely to try to attempt break the 100m world record than attempt to win at 10K, perhaps?

I lived in Sheffield from 1992-1997 and used to swim in pond's forge quite often but at the time wouldn't have been aware of it's speed as I was a leisure breast stroker.

I do remember preferring to pay to go there than to swim for free in the university pool, so there may have been something.

the pool at Hillingdon sports and leisure complex is of a similar standard I think and most of my pb's in the last two year's have been made there on random visits to the UK, I thought it was the change of water from Norway but maybe it's the different pool.

UK swimming needs better technique training at local club level. I've watched club sessions over the last 20 years and never see any technical discussion or coaching, just metre based sessions and drills. Balance, Streamline and technique for many aren't discussed until they reach national level? I'd love to know the performance times of the 100th best uk freestyler compared to US, Australia or China (or Brazil).

craig.arnold@gmail.com
08-09-2013, 08:53 AM
I'm sure Australia has more 50m pools in their high schools than we do in our whole country.

The USA probably has more 50m pools per state in their high schools than we do in the UK.

Does anyone know how many 50m pools there are in the UK? It's probably about 20. And combine that with the fact that almost all of 50m pools are divided into 2x25m for 90% of the time. Bah. Enough to make the blood boil.

Actually I think we do exceptionally well considering the facilities we have - in all sports. Things have improved since the lottery funding came along, but we are still so far behind it's ridiculous.

Richardsk
08-09-2013, 09:07 AM
I suppose since Sun is certainly capable of breaking world records in all freestyle events down to 200m he might also be capable of breaking the record for the 100m. That would be a tall order because it was set in the fast suit era and I don't think even Magnussen has been below 47 since the suits were banned. The fact that Sun can turn on the kind of sprint he can tack on to the end of a 1500 makes one wonder what he could do if he trained specifically for the 100. Park has swum around 49, I think, and is about six inches shorter than Sun. Sun's split in the 4 x 200 is an indication of what he might be capable of.

SUN 0.26 24.21 50.60 1:17.30 1:43.16 (fastest of race)

compared to

LOCHTE 0.20 23.94 51.34 1:17.89 1:44.98 (fastest of USA)

or
IZOTOV 0.73 24.35 50.81 1:17.87 1:45.14 (fastest of RUS)

or
STRAVIUS 0.28 23.75 50.50 1:18.38 1:45.41 (fastest of FRA)

terry
08-09-2013, 10:12 AM
The USA probably has more 50m pools per state in their high schools than we do in the UK.

There is a small handful of US high schools with 50m pools--nearly all because it was built as the community pool. Most US high schools have no pool. I've never lived in a community where the HS had a pool. The great majority that do, have 25y pools.

A relatively small number of universities have 50m pools--though all of the top 20 NCAA programs do. Some have two.

My impression is that there's a far greater concentration of 50m pools in Europe than in most of the US. The exceptions would be Florida, Arizona and CA.

terry
08-09-2013, 10:15 AM
I think Sun has a good chance to win Olympic gold in 200m, but I feel as if the rubber-suit WR is out of his reach.
As for 100m international titles, I think that would be a stretch. 10k gold not a stretch at all.

Katie Ledecky also had one of the faster 4x200 splits -- 1:55 something.

CoachToby
08-09-2013, 07:30 PM
It's probably been noticed before on this forum, but I'll just draw attention to it anyway incase some missed it: Sun regularly takes a double breath before going into the flip turn, and somtimes takes a breath on the first two, or even three, strokes after the turn. I've incorporated this into my own lap swimming with great effect. Amazing how much better it feels when your not starved of oxygen!

andyinnorway
08-10-2013, 06:44 PM
It's probably been noticed before on this forum, but I'll just draw attention to it anyway incase some missed it: Sun regularly takes a double breath before going into the flip turn, and somtimes takes a breath on the first two, or even three, strokes after the turn. I've incorporated this into my own lap swimming with great effect. Amazing how much better it feels when your not starved of oxygen!

a good reason to be streamlined whilst breathing on both sides,

there seem to be 8 olympic pools in the UK (official 10 lane capable of international competition) with 4 more under construction

there are a further 40, 50 metre pools that do not meet international competition standards.


There are also some random long lido's

I think from memory this is about the same number as perth has on it's own.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_long_course_swimming_pools_in_the_United_K ingdom#Olympic_size_pools

johnniewalk
07-19-2016, 10:22 AM
The youtube links which has been posted in this thread, those videos has been expired..

Richardsk
07-20-2016, 10:11 AM
Here's a link to the 4x100 men's relay at Barcelona with commentary in Spanish.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aX1_tEXqxfY&index=5&list=LLtnz8mGHnoaw7lVBcKRe1VA


I'm sure the other events are still available if one searches.